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Newton, Massachusetts 02159 Academic Catalog 1971 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart 




Table of Contents 

The Curriculum / 2 
Courses of Instruction / 6 
Fees and Expenses / 46 
Registry / 48 
Calendar / IBC 



The College reserves the right to make changes in the regulations and courses announced in this catalog. 



Newton, Massachusetts 02159 



Academic Catalog 1971 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart 



»St 





The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor 
of Science degree have been so arranged as to leave the 
fullest freedom of choice to the student while still ensuring a 
broad acquaintance with the main field of scholarly interest. 
Work in the major field is intended to lay a firm foundation 
in one discipline, or, in the case of the Liberal Studies major, 
to assist the student to achieve a synthesis of her knowledge 
as she draws it from a number of different disciplines and 
applies it to her chosen problems. 

Along with freedom to choose among different courses and 
disciplines, the student is also exposed to a variety of educa- 
tional situations as part of her learning. Instruction occurs 
not only through lectures, but also field work, tutorials, inde- 
pendent research, cinema, foreign study, and cjos s-registra- 
tion at other Boston-area institutions. 

~~bach "sTDtfent is~~p~e~i b on a lty responsible for knowing the 
academic policies and fulfilling the academic requirements 

ithat apply to her that are stated in the official catalog of 
Newton College of the Sacred Heart. 



Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

Most students take four semesters of The Study of World 
Cultures as the basis of their liberal arts program. The course 
provides an opportunity to single out for attention the great 
problems which ha ve faced WesiefrTman. By way of~com"p~ari- 
sohT other cultures are drawn upon to illuminate the manner 
in which mankind has grappled with its questions— political, 
social, economic, philosophical, artistic and religious. Mem- 
bers of the Newton College faculty lecture in the course and 
eminent scholars from other colleges and universities (e.g. 
Boston College, Brandeis, Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology) also contribute to the variety and richness of the 
intellectual experience. A list of readings centering largely on 
the great masterpieces of the world gives depth to the treat- 
ment of the materiaT~These~7eacfings and the lectures are 
subjected to spe cjaj analysis in weekly seminars. The course, 
which is ^Jjaurly .j' not a "survey," is interdiseipUoary-Ja 
nature arTcfseTectlve inJls-Q overag e. It seeks to bring about 
an "illumination ofTRernind" rather than the mere retention 
of a mass of facts. Students who have completed the course 
are usually enthusiastic about its value to them. Yet there will 
always be students who find a pre-established series of lec- 
tures and readings not sufficiently suited to their own needs. 
Such students may present an alternate progra m accounti ng i 
fofaboui Tne"sam« diiiuunrof credit and Ttllfllllng~"so me of Xh e 1 
same^objectives as arS-setrqht in I he St udy u f WorlcTCultures. J 



If their program meeTS^wTth the approval of the Academic 
Dean they may proceed with it. Such a plan may be sub- 
stituted for the whole or for a part of The Study of World 
Cultures. 

Entering students are required to demonstrate during the 
freshman _yeai^profir:iermy^in-Enql l';h Co mpo sition. This may 
be accomplished in three ways: 

a) bX-SCQr ing 3 or abovej u-tfae. Advanced Placement Exami- 
.oatjon 

b) by passing a Proficiency Examination offered during Orien- 
tation at Newton College (students scoring below 575 
on the College Board's English Achievement Test are not 
encouraged to seek exemption from Freshman Composi- 
tion.) 

c) by successfully completing two semesters of Freshman 
Composition. 

Students scoring 4 or 5 in the Advanced Placement Examina- 
tion receive six credits towards graduation. In addition, all 
freshmen who do not have a medical exemption are required 
to complete two^emesters of P hysic al- Educat ion. 

Each student wUk^eJe^i.^majoxJieJci. in which she must 
meet the requirements established by the department. In all 
other aspects the student is free to choose her own courses. 



The Degree ot Bachelor ot Science 

Newton College also offers the Bachelor of Science degree. 
The requirements are the same as those for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree with a heavier sgecJalizatiojiuiiJh_esciences. 



The Major 



ie major fields of study offered at Newton College of the 



£ 



Sacred Heart are the following: 
American Studies 
Art 

Art History 
Biology 
Chemistry 
'Classics 

Comparative Literature 
Economics 
English 
French 
German 
History 




Liberal Studies 
'Mathematics O^ 

Modern Languages 
Philosophy i\ 
•Physics -7^' 



Political Science 

Pre-dental Studies 

Pre-medical Studies 

Psychology 

Religion 

Sociology 

Spanish 



^Jn conjunction with Boston College 



All major fields look to preparation for graduate study but 
they also offer the student who will not pursue the subject 
matter at a higher level the possibility of gaining skills and 
insights and, at least in some measure, the particular qualities 
of mind which that discipline especially imparts. 

Interdisciplinary Majors 

Several of the above mpntinppri majnr fjpiHti of study are 
j pterdisclpJinacy by nature. Am erican Studies^ affords the stu- 
dentlhe possibility of concentrating her attention on the polit- 
ical, social and cultural history of the United States as she 
takes courses dealing with American art, government, phil- 
osophy__l!terature, music, economic structure, as well as his- 
tory. CciassIc^ combines the study of the Latin and Greek 
l anguages and jjterature with that of classical history and art. 
< CornDarative~Liter"ature*) intearates_Jhe_ knowledge of more than 
one literature. The major in ^ Modern Language^ allows the 
student to study two of the five modern tongues taught at 
Newton College — French," German^ Italian, 1 ' Russian and 
SpanisKf A major inCgj e^medicaJ, Studied usually involves work 
in biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics while leaving 
enough flexibility to allow the student to meet the sometimes 
differing requirements of several medical schools. TtaeJJberaf 
^Stu dies majo fr allows each selected student to develop her 
own curriculum under the guidance of one or more faculty 
members. 




lere are also two fields of studvA-e ducation an drnusic— . 
which, though not constituting a majorTieia, "offer a sequence 
of courses amounting to some thirty semester hours and are 
open to students of all majors. 



1.<J HE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Education Program meets the certification requirement 
of Massachusetts, and of most other states because of the 
reciprocity arrangements among the states of the United 
States. The purpose of the innovative program is to bring as 
much and as varied field experience in community education 
settings as possible within the range of the students. Seminars 
guided by practitioners in different aspects of elementary and 
secondary school teaching will assist students to relate their 
experiences to the body of theory built up by professional 
educationists. Flexibility in structure and responsiveness in 
planning each student's curriculum characterize the program 
which is available to all students to complement their major 
field. The divisions n1 jrionr P fl nw mnHom laqgnpigoQ have 
established special progMwws-m-cullaboralion with the faculty 
of the Education department to prepare students for teaching 
in th"sp, fields 




2.\^H_E^MUS JC PROGRAM^ 

The musiccourses offered' at Newton College of the Sacred 
Heart are intended to form an important part of the liberal 
arts curriculum and they make use of the remarkable musical 



facilities of the Boston area. 
Academic Policies 



MtnjJfc 



Each candidate for the Bachelor of Arts~~oTThe Bachelor of 
Science degree must have one hundred twenty-eight credits 
while maintaining a passing cumulative grade point average 
(2.0). The normal period of time in which to earn the degree is 
four years and a normal program of study consists of sixteen 
semester hour credits a semester. The student must fulfill 
the requirements of a major field_an d must spend her fou rth 
year in academic residenc^^TTtheTthe second or third year 
may be spent studying abroad. 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE: 

Drop — At the beginning of each semester there is a period in 
which students may withdraw from courses without penalty. 
After this period it is necessary to secure the approval of both 
the faculty member teaching tb©-course and the Office of the 
Academic Dean. A notation ((fAW^Approved Withdrawal) will 
appear on the transcript of a student who has dropped a 
course. No indication of a grade in the dropped course will 



TfDW 



be given. If a student fails to notify the Registrar's office that 
she has officially withdrawn from any course for which she 
has officially registered, a grade of no credit will be entered 
on heiLpermanent record for this course. 

V^Add^^At the beginning of each semester there is a speci- 
fied period in which students may add courses to their sched- 
ule. After this period, approval must be obtained from the 
faculty member teaching the course and from the Office of 
the Academic Dean. 

Fee — Ther e is a $10 fee for dropping or adding a course 
ajter the initial periocT 




^ 



4* 







FOR QTHER ACADEMIC WORK 
Thirty-two creditsj s the maximum to be accepted by Newton 
ollege for a year of study abroad or at another college in 
the United States. 

Summer study, either in the United States or abroad, is 

allowed and sometimes advised. Courses taken in summer 

school may count as upper-division cnu rs** in a maj^r r ]a \r\ 

i\ e {Mhes tudent receives the approval of thp HP P artm Pn t h ead 

ancTthe Office of the Academic Dean . Courses not in the stu- 

l| yJent's major field only neecTthe approval of the Office of the 

% Ac ademic Dean . Credit will be transferred from any accredited 

college or university for a course in which the student has 

received a grade of C or above subject to the poli cy state d 

aboy jt No more than nine credits altogether may~~be trans^] 

feTreo - from summer sessions, regardless of how many ses/ 

sions the student attends. / 

CROSS-REGISTRATION 

Cross-registration is arranged with colleges in the vicinity 
during the Fall and Spring semesters. Credit will be trans- 
ferred only with the approval of the Office of the Academic 

Dean JC (dukJjkt\X^) 

GRADING SYSTEM ^ \ 

The grading system is as follows: 



Letter Grade 
A 

B+ 
B 


Grade Points 
4.0 
3.5 
3.0 


Quality Points 
Grade points 
times .a*- 
the \l>* 


C 


2.0 


number of 


D 
No credit 


1.0 



semester hours 



Th e semester average is found by dividing the sum of t hp 
quality points by the number of semester hours tak^ n The 
pumulative average is the average of the semester grade poi nt 
a verages to date . The passing cumulative average and the 
passing semester average are both 2.0. 

Once a final grade is reported to the Office of the Registrar, 
it cannot be changed without the approval of the Academic 
Dean. Requests for such changes must be in writing by the 
faculty member to the Dean, giving full reasons for the re- 
quested change. 



HONORS: 










(Computed on 


each 


(Computed on 




semester's work 


the cumulative 


/^\ 


taken alone) 




average) 


/ 3.5 \ 


Dean's List 




Cum Laude at 
Graduation 


3.7 


Honor List 




Magna Cum Laude 
at Graduation 


V 3.9 / 


High Honors 




Summa Cum Laude 
at Graduation 



(t) 



A portfolio of recommendations and evaluations of each 
student majoring in a field will be kept in the department and 
will be used in interpreting the student's record. Due to a 
change in the grading system, the classes of 1972 and 1973 
will have a slightly different honors system. 

INCOMPLETE GRADES 

The grade "Incomplete" can only be given with the written 
| approval of the instructor and of the Office of the Academic 
tDean. Such approval must be gained before the beginning of 
the examination period and will be given only in the cases 
of illness or real emergency. All take-home examinations and 
final papers must be given to professors on or before the date 
specified for the final examination. Approved "Incompletes" 
will include the date by which the work will be completed. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND READING COURSES 
Many departments of the College offer a program wnich pro- 
vides the possibility of students taki ng one course in a) sem es- 
ter of individual study directed bylT member of the/ faculty. 
fpndeF fFTis program an eligible student may undertake a 
research project or a program of reading in a particular field. 
The results of this work normally will be presented in a final 
report or examination. To be eligible for credit in such a 
course a student must present in advance to tHe Office of the 



h 




Academic Dean a written description of the course, the num- 
ber of credits- desired, and the name and signature of ap- 
proval of her instructor. Only after she has received the 
approval > of the Dean's Office may she undertake such a 
course. Approval is not given for a reading or independent 
study course in a subject matter handled in regular courses. 



PASS/FAIL COURSES 



Students in the sophomoreV^unior and senior classes may 
take courses on a Pass/Fail basis up to the number of six 
courses for the three years. This option does not apply to 

IThe Study of World Cultures or to courses to be used for 
upper-division credit in the major field. The decision to take 
a course Pass/Fail rather than for a letter grade must be 
made at the time of registration or during the period for 
adjusting registration given at the beginning of each semester. 

ffcEADMISSION 

/Any student who has withdrawn from Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart in good standing may be readmitted under the 
■ conditions that apply to transfer students. 

REGISTRATION 

Students should register on the registration dates announced 
in the College calendar. Permission of the Registrar must be 
secured for registration on dates other than those assigned. 
No credit will be given for any course for which the student 
is not duly registered and. which is not officially scheduled. 

STUDENT COURSE LOAD 

Students are ordinarily not allowed to take more than sixteen 
semester hour credits per semester. Permission to take addi- 
tional credit must be obtained from the Office of the Academic 
Dean and a fee of $70 for each credit above the maximum 
will be charged. This additional tuition fee does not apply to 
the class of 1972. 

(Note: Students taking The Study of World Cultures are 
allowed to take_ seventeen credits without being obligated to 
pay for the extra credit.) 

STUDY ABROAD 

Programs which include a year of study abroad are an im- 
portant part of the curriculum at Newton Colle ge o f the 
Sacred Heart. A student with a cumulative avemn arf^raflV/ ho 
wishes to take a year abroad should discuss her plans well 
in advance with the Office of the Academic Dean and with 
one or more professors in her major field. Approval will be 
contingent on the possibility of her completing the work 
successfully. 



WITHDRAWALS 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the College must 
make application to the Aca demic Dean and Registrar for 
permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who is on 
academic or disciplinary probation is not considered to be 
in good standing. 

Any student whose cumulative average falls below 2.0 is 
subject to being asked to withdraw from the College. The 
College may request withdrawal of any student whose be- 
havior is not in accord with the standard required by the—. 
College. All withdrawals must be made officially through the 
Offices of the Academic Dean, the Dean of Students, the ' 
Business Manager and the Registrar. 



Division of 
Language, Literature and Communications 



Courses with a double number extend through two semesters. 
Odd-numbered courses are given in the first semester; even- 
numbered courses in the second. The number in parentheses 
after the title of the course indicates the number of semester 
hours of credit. Courses are offered only if a sufficient number 
enroll for them. Some courses are offered every year; others in 
alternate years. Students should consult their department 
chairmen in developing their programs of study. 

Classics Program 

Classics are offered in cooperation with the Department of 
Classics at Boston College. Some courses are offered at 
Newton College, and a member of the Newton College faculty 
directs the students' programs. The scholarly and artistic 
resources of the Boston area are available to students in this 
field. 

The student in Classics may take: four years of Latin and 
two of Greek, or four of Greek and two of Latin, or the 
equivalent of such a program. 



CL L 101-102 Elementary Latin (3, 3) 

CL L 201-202 Virgil (3, 3) 

Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. 

CL L 301-302 History of Latin Literature (3, 3) 

First term: Republic; Second term: Empire. 

(Advanced Latin courses are offered as tutorials.) 

CL G 101-102 Elementary Greek (3,3) 

CL G 201-202 Intermediate Greek (3, 3) 

Review of grammar and introduction to Greek literature. 

CL 495 Senior Seminar (3, 3) 

CL 497-498 Independent Study (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the pro- 
fessor giving the course and as approved by a representative 
of the Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that In- 
dependent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

COURSES IN TRANSLATION 

CL 103-104 (PS 103-104) Dissent: The Growth of Con- 
sciousness in Antiquity (3, 3) 

The theme of dissent will serve as a framework within which 
major figures of Greek and Roman Civilization, both literary 
and historical, will be studied. Readings, discussions, and 
occasional lectures. No prerequisites. 

CL 203-204 (Comp L 203-204) Introduction to Classical 

Civilization (3, 3) 
Study of important Greek and Latin writers in their historical 
context. 

Comparative Literature Program 

The student in Comparative Literature is required to take: one 
course in post-medieval literature if the student's major 
interests are classical and medieval; one course in classical 
and/or medieval literature if the student's major interests are 
Renaissance to Modern. 



12 credits in a primary literature 
6 credits in a secondary literature 
12 credits in Comparative Literature 
Eight courses, with a grade of C or better, must count 

for upper-division credit. 
Senior Project (Eng 225 and either Eng 213 or Eng 214 
are highly recommended.) 
Students must work closely with an advisor in setting up 
their individual programs. 

Comp L 203-204 (CL 203-204; Introduction to Classical 

Civilization (3, 3) 

Study of Greek and Latin writers in their historical context. 

Comp L 205-206 Comparative Romance Literature (3, 3) 

(Comp L 305-306 for Modern Language majors. See page 
10) 

The aim of the course is to offer students of language and 
literature an opportunity to study various literary movements 
in Italy, France and Spain through representative writers. The 
course will concentrate on the variations and interpretations 
of the theme of love (courtly and neoplatonic traditions), 
death and fate which highlighted the literature of these coun- 
tries during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The course 
will be conducted in English and bilingual texts will be used. 

Comp L 301-302 Romantic Movement in Europe (3, 3) 

An inquiry into the origins and development of Romanticism 
in literature through study of major works by continental and 
British writers. 

Comp L 303-304 Contemporary European Novel (3, 3) 

Themes and techniques in representative English and con- 
tinental novels from Flaubert to the present. 

Comp L 499 Senior Project (0, 3) 

Note: Comp L 205-206, 301-302 and 303-304 may be counted 
as credit towards majors in Spanish, French, or German pro- 
vided that a significant portion of the course is supervised by 
the respective language department. Under these conditions 
Comp L 205-206 becomes Comp L 305-306. Comp L 301-302 
and 303-304 carry upper division credit for English majors. 

English 

The student in English is required to complete: Eng 201-202 
(may be waived by passing a qualifying examination); Eng 
213 or Eng 214 (should be taken sophomore year); Eng 311- 



312 and six upper division courses, with a grade of C or 
better, two of which must be in the period preceding 1800. A 
Senior Project shall be completed. 

A minor in English consists of Eng 201-202 and three upper 
division courses or four upper division courses with a grade 
of C or better. 

All majors should submit their proposed schedule of 
courses to the department chairman prior to registration. 

Successful completion of Freshman Composition (see gen- 
eral requirements for the degree) is prerequisite for all 
courses except Eng 201-202 and Eng 203. 

All courses are open to non-English majors with the per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Eng 101-102 Freshman Composition (3, 3) 

Reading, discussion and writing centered on various topics 
selected by the staff. Intensive practice in the strategy and 
rhetoric of expository writing. Required for most students; see 
General Requirements for the degree. 

Eng 201-202 History of English Literature (3, 3) 

A survey of English literature designed to give the student a 
background for more specialized courses. Both semesters re- 
quired of English majors: may be waived by passing qualifying 
examination. 

Eng 203 The Image of Woman in Literature (3) 

Selected works from classic and modern literature focused 
on modes of feminine being. Analysis of some myths, fantasies 
and stereotypes recurrent in the literary portrayal of woman. 

Eng 213 Introduction to Drama (3) 

Several modern plays compared with plays of earlier periods 
in order to explore the historical and theatrical relations 
between them. 

Eng 214 Introduction to the Novel (3) 

Practice in critical analysis of fiction and in critical writing 
through the intensive study of a single English or American 
novel. 

Eng 225 Introduction to Literary Theory (3) 

Reading and discussion of modern theories of the nature and 
function of literature. Highly recommended for English majors. 

Eng 241-242 Creative Writing (3, 3) 

Workshop in fiction, poetry and drama. Writing sample must 
be submitted. Enrollment limited to 12. 



Eng 285-286 Post-World War II British and American 
Novel (2, 2) 

Reading and class discussion of eight novels each semester. 
First Semester: English. Second Semester: American. 

Eng 301 Old English Language and Literature (3) 

Introduction to Old English grammar; reading, analysis and 
discussion of Old English poetry and prose in the original 
and in translation. 

Eng 305-306 Fourteenth Century English Literature (3, 3) 

First Semester: readings in Canterbury Tales with collateral 
readings in contemporary related authors. Second Semester: 
Chaucer, exclusive of Canterbury Tales, English mystical 
writers, cycle plays. The course will attempt to relate literary 
movements of the fourteenth century with more contemporary 
movements in English Literature. 

Eng 307 Sixteenth Century English Literature (3) 

Study of the poetry and prose of the early Renaissance in 
England. Continental backgrounds. 

Eng 308 Spenser (3) 

Reading and analysis of the minor poems and the Faerie 
Queene. 

Eng 311-312 Shakespeare (3, 3) 

Reading of the collected plays, with class discussion of 
history and criticism. Both semesters required of English 
majors. 

Eng 313 Seventeenth Century English Literature (3) 

Study of poetry and prose of the late Renaissance in England. 

Eng 314 Milton (3) 

Reading, analysis and discussion of Milton's poetry and prose. 

Eng 315 Eighteenth Century Novel (3) 

A study in the development of the novel as an art form. 
Authors to be read include DeFoe, Richardson, Fielding, 
Smollett, Sterne, Goldsmith and Fanny Burney. 

Eng 317 Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century Litera- 
ture (3) 
A study of prose, drama and poetry centering around 1660; 
the focus will be on the new city culture emerging and its 
influence on the development of Neo-classicism. Authors in- 
clude: Butler, Bunyan, DeFoe, Pepys, Dryden, Pope and 
Swift. 



Eng 320 The Novel in the Nineteenth Century (3) 

Fiction from Jane Austen to Thomas Hardy. Several novels 
will be studied both as artistic creations and as cultural and 
social documents. 

Eng 321 Romantic Poets (3) 

Extensive reading of the major poets (Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Byron) with class discussion of the 
spirit and literary theory of the school. 

Eng 322 Victorian Poetry (3) 

Readings in the poetry of Tennyson, Browning and Arnold. 
These authors followed by a study of the Pre-Raphaelites with 
attention paid to the relationships these painter-poets made 
between art and poetry. 

Eng 341-342 Modern Novel (3, 3) 

The novel from the end of the nineteenth century through the 
first half of the twentieth. First Semester: English. Second 
Semester: American. Reading and discussion of eight novels 
each semester. 

Eng 343-344 Modern Drama (3, 3) 

The drama from the end of the nineteenth century through 
the present. First Semester: English and Continental. Second 
Semester: American. Extensive reading and discussion. 

Eng 345-346 Modern Poetry (3, 3) 

Close reading of twentieth-century poets, with some research 
on minor figures. First Semester: English. Second Semester: 
American. 

Eng 349 Satire (3) 

Selected satiric works representing various genres and pe- 
riods from classical to modern times. Discussion of the the- 
ory, themes and techniques of satire. Analysis of the problems 
involved in defining satire from social, philosophical and 
formalist points of view. 

Eng 351-352 Survey of American Literature (3, 3) 

Fall Semester: Study of American Literature from the seven- 
teenth to the nineteenth century with emphasis on developing 
awareness of the Millennium. Spring Semester: Disillusion- 
ment in the Millennium and the American Dream become 
Nightmare (Walt Whitman — LeRoi Jones). 



Eng 361 Seminar in Hawthorne, Melville and Whitman 

(3) 
In-depth study of major texts of three most significant writers 
of the American Romantic Movement. Seminar will deal with 
creative writing of these authors and with significant critical 
analyses made by them. 

Eng 364 Racial Attitudes in American Literature (3) 

A study of the differing attitudes towards race as seen through 
black and white literature in America. The course will focus 
on creative fiction in an attempt to understand how attitudes 
are transformed into symbols, myth, etc. 

Eng 365 Harlem Renaissance and Beyond (3) 

Study of the creative writings of Afro-American artists during 
the period from 1910-1945 with reference to their influence on 
Black Literature today. Enrollment limited to 30. 

Eng 366 Contemporary Literature in America (3) 

Discussion of drama, novels and poetry considered in the 
light of the cultural and aesthetic values of contemporary 
America. 

Eng 368 Modern Literature of the American South (3) 

Fiction, essays and poetry of writers, such as Katherine Ann 
Porter, William Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe and James Dickey, 
considered against the historical and cultural background of 
the South. 

Eng 371 Jane Austen (2) 

Reading of the complete works, with class discussion of the 
novelist as a traditional figure in the development of the form. 

Eng 372 Henry James (2) 

Reading of six of the major novels, with class discussion of 
style, structure and influence. 

Eng 373 Jacobean Drama (3) 

A study of the background and analyses of the plays of the 
Jacobean Period from Marston to the closing of the theaters. 
Readings will include works of Webster, Tourneur, Middleton 
and Ford, as well as playwrights who influenced them. 

Eng 374 African Literature in English (3) 

An examination of the developing traditions of the literature 
of the emerging nations of English-speaking Africa. The 
majority of the novels to be studied have been written within 
the last fifteen years and deal with such problems as apart- 
heid, the destruction of tribal life, the journey to the Euro- 



peanized African city and the conflict between the colonized 
and the colonizer. 

Eng 375 Anglo-Irish (3) 

Discussion of drama, poetry and fiction of the Irish literary 
Renaissance of the first half of the nineteenth century. 

Eng 380 Criticism (3) 
A seminar on twentieth-century literary critics, mostly Ameri- 
can. Literary Theory would be a desirable prerequisite. 

Eng 497-498 Independent Study in English (0-3; 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor giving the course and as approved by a repre- 
sentative of the Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

Eng 499 Senior Project (0-3) 
Note: Comp L 301-302 and 303-304 carry upper-division 
credit for English majors. 

Department of Modern Languages 

The minimum requirements for the major are: 
Single Language Major: 

8 credit hours in Elementary courses or qualifying profici- 
ency test; 
6 credit hours in Intermediate courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
24 credit hours in Upper Division courses with a grade of 
C or better; 
Senior Project 

Combined Modern Language Major: 
A. Major Language 

8 credit hours in Elementary courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
6 credit hours in Intermediate courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
18 credit hours in Upper Division courses with a grade 
of C or better; 
Senior Project 



B. Minor Language 

8 credit hours in Elementary courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
6 credit hours in Intermediate courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
12 credit hours in Upper Division courses with a grade 
of C or better 
Students are advised to visit with the professors of the 
Department of Modern Languages for more information on 
qualifying tests, courses offered abroad, senior project and 
independent studies. 

ML 301-302 Introduction to Linguistics (3, 3) 

This course can be taken by all Modern Language majors and 
will provide for special assignment in the individual target 
language. It will cover the following: phonetics and phonology 
of language; principles of structural linguistics; a survey of 
modern grammars; semantics; etymology, essentials of his- 
torical linguistics; the principal theories on the psychology 
and philosophy of language. 

ML 497-498 Independent Studies in Modern Languages 

(0, 3; 0, 3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of In- 
dependent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

ML 499 Senior Projects (0, 3) 

Comp L 301-302 Romantic Movement in Europe (3, 3) 

An inquiry into the origins and development of Romanticism 
in literature through study of major works by continental and 
British writers. 

Comp L 303-304 Contemporary European Novel (3, 3) 

Themes and techniques in representative English and conti- 
nental novels from Flaubert to the present. 

Comp L 305-306 Comparative Romance Literature (3, 3) 

The aim of this course is to offer students of language and 
literature an opportunity to study various literary movements 



in Italy, France and Spain through representative writers. The 
course will concentrate on the variations and interpretations 
of the theme of love (courtly and neoplatonic traditions), 
death, and fate which highlighted the literature of these coun- 
tries during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The course 
will be conducted in English. 

Note: ML 301-302 carries upper division credit for all Modern 
Language Majors. Comp L 301-302, 303-304, 305-306 carry 
upper division credit for Modern Language Majors provided 
the reading and papers are done in the target language under 
the supervision of the respective language professor. 

FRENCH 
Fr 101-102 Elementary French (4, 4) 

For the student with little or no previous knowledge of French. 
Three class sessions will be devoted to the acquisition of 
reading and writing skills and two laboratory sessions will be 
devoted to aural-oral practice. 

Fr 201a & b-202a & b Intermediate French (3, 3) 

This course is intended to develop the four skills of language: 
understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Three class 
sessions will be devoted to grammar review, reading and 
writing. In addition two laboratory sessions of aural-oral prac- 
tice. (Optional) 

Fr 207-208 High Intermediate Conversation and Composi- 
tion (3, 3) 

A review of the fundamentals of the language supplemented 
by reading of literature and cultural material; practice in the 
oral use of the language; intensive study of vocabulary struc- 
tures and idiomatic expressions. 

Fr 301-302 Survey of French Literature (3, 3) 

An historical and critical study of the important literary move- 
ments and the most representative authors of French litera- 
ture from Middle Ages to the present. 

Fr 303-304 French Civilization (3, 3) 

A study of French historical and cultural background: its 
geographical aspects and growth of its arts, sciences and 
institutions. Prerequisite: a good understanding of spoken 
French. 

Fr 305-306 Advanced Conversation and Stylistics (3, 3) 

This course is designed for students who wish to improve 
their conversational ability: class discussions, intensive train- 



10 



ing in the use of grammatical and idiomatic constructions. 
Advanced stylistics. Introduction to varied types of literary 
composition in French: narration, description, "analyse I it— 
teraire" and "dissertation litteraire". Free composition in each 
of these literary types will be required from the students. 
Prerequisite: Fr 203-204. 

Fr 307 French Phonetics and Diction (3) 

An analytic study of all French speech sounds as well as 
intonation, rhythm, accent and movement for the expressive 
reading of prose and poetry. Systematic exercises in pro- 
nounciation and intonation. 

Fr 308 The French Humanists (3) 

A study of the works of Rabelais, Montaigne and the human- 
ist movement in the sixteenth century and of the repercus- 
sions of this movement in the seventeenth century. 

Fr 309 French Classicism (3) 

The elaboration, fixation and realization of the French Classic 
doctrine as seen through the prose and poetry of the seven- 
teenth century French literature. Study of the most represen- 
tative works of great poets, fabulists and mondain writers. 

Fr 310 Corneille, Racine, Moliere (3) 
The development of the classic theater from the baroque: 
new theories of the dramatic, the tragic and the comic. Lit- 
erary analysis of the dramaturgists' masterpieces. 

Fr 311 The Age of Enlightenment (3) 

An investigation of the changing concept of man and its in- 
fluence on social and political thought as seen through Mon- 
tesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire and Rousseau. 

Fr 313 Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud (3) 

An insight into the symbolist poetical expression. 

Fr 315 The Short Story in France (3) 

The major trends of the short story of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries are considered. Intensive reading of works 
of Merimee, Daudet, Maupassant, Saint Exupery, lonesco, 
Romain Gary and others will be required. 

Fr 316 Twentieth Century French Drama (3) 

Discussion of plays from the French Theater from 1920 to the 
present. Extensive outside reading required. 

Fr 318 French Seminar (3) 

Subject to be announced. Can be elected as Senior Project. 



Comp. L 301-302 Romantic Movement in Europe (3, 3) 

See course description on page 10. 

Comp. L 303-304 Contemporary European Novel (3, 3) 

See course description on page 10. 

Comp. L 305-306 Comparative Romance Literature 

(3,3) 
See course description on page 10. 

Fr 499 Senior Project (0-3) 
GERMAN 

Ger 101-102 Elementary German (4,4) 
Three class sessions will be devoted to essentials of grammar 
and the acquisition of reading and writing skills. In addition: 
two laboratory sessions of aural-oral practice. 

Ger 201-202 Intermediate German (3, 3) 

This course aims at the further development of the four skills 
of language: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. 
Three class sessions will be devoted to reading and discuss- 
ing works of literary merit and cultural interest and to a com- 
plete grammar review. In addition two laboratory sessions of 
aural-oral practice. (Optional). Course conducted primarily in 
German. 

Ger 301-302 Survey of German Literature (3, 3) 

Lectures in German; reading and discussion of typical works 
of each period. Fall semester: German literature from the 
medieval period to Goethe. Spring semester: German litera- 
ture from Romanticism to the present day. 

Ger 303 304 German Civilization (3, 3) 

An intensive study through German texts of the cultural and 
historical background of the German speaking peoples. Fall 
semester: From the beginning to the Baroque Period. Spring 
semester: From the Age of Enlightenment to the present. 
Conducted in German. 

Ger 305-306 German Literature in the Eighteenth Century 

(3,3) 
Lectures in German of the nature and background of the 
eighteenth century. Reading and discussion of representative 
works with emphasis on Lessing, Goethe and Schiller. 

Ger 307-308 Contemporary German Literature (3, 3) 

Literary trends in Germany and Austria from 1885 to the pres- 
ent. Extensive reading. Conducted in German. 



11 



Ger 309-310 Advanced German Conversation and Compo- 
sition (3, 3) 

Intensive training in the use of correct grammatical and idio- 
matic constructions. Advanced stylistics. Oral and written re- 
ports on selected topics will be required. 

Ger 312 German Seminar (3) 

Subject to be announced. Can be elected as Senior Project. 

Comp L 301-302 Romantic Movement in Europe (3,3) 
See course description on page 10. 

Comp L 303-304 Contemporary European Novel (3, 3) 

See course description on page 10. 

Ger 499 Senior Project (0-3) 



ITALIAN 
It 101-102 Elementary Italian (4, 4) 

Introduction to Italian language through basic conversation 
patterns and essentials of grammar. Weekly language labora- 
tory session and special classroom exercises aimed at the 
acquisition of a reading knowledge. 

It 201-202 Intermediate Italian (3, 3) 

Continuation of Elementary Italian, with stress on oral expres- 
sion and composition. Basic grammatical structures will be 
analyzed during the reading of Italian prose especially chosen 
for its cultural and literary values. Conducted exclusively in 
Italian. 

It 251-252 Advanced Italian (3, 3) 

While the emphasis of the course will be on the development 
of language skills through intensive conversations and com- 
positions, the student will be introduced to various aspects of 
Italian culture and history. Conducted in Italian. 

It 301-302 Italian Literature I (3, 3) 

Following a series of lectures on literary precepts and the- 
ories, the Italian literary language and some principles of 
aesthetics, the first semester the course will follow the de- 
velopments of lyric poetry and related literary movements. 
Emphasis will be placed on the works of Dante, Petrarch, 



Lorenzo de Medici, Poliziano and Pulci. The development of 
Italian prose and its various manifestations will be studied 
during the second semester. Emphasis will be placed on 
Boccaccio, Machiavelli and selected writers of the Renais- 
sance. Conducted in Italian. 



Comp L 305-306 Comparative Romance Literature 

See course description on page 10. 



(3,3) 



RUSSIAN 

Rus 101-102 Elementary Russian (4, 4) 

Simplified Russian grammar supplemented by reading from 
Graded Readers. Intensive study of vocabulary and phonetics. 
Practice in speaking the language. Three class sessions will 
be devoted to reading and writing skills, as well as elemen- 
tary conversation and one hour of language laboratory work 
is required. 

Rus 201-202 Intermediate Russian (3, 3) 

Advanced grammar. Reading of selected prose. Conversation. 

Rus 301-302 Survey of Russian Literature (3, 3) 

Biographies of the great Russian writers of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries and the reading of their major works in 
Russian. 

Rus 303-304 Russian Civilization (3, 3) 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the language stu- 
dent to Russian civilization: history, art, music, as well as the 
economy and the geography of the Soviet Union. Conducted 
in Russian. 

SPANISH 

Sp 101-102 Elementary Spanish (4,4) 
An introductory course using the oral-aural approach. This 
course is intended to develop the four skills of language: 
speaking, understanding, reading and writing. 

Sp 201-202 Intermediate Spanish (3,3) 
Continuation of Elementary Spanish at a more advanced level. 
Practice in composition and conversation. Readings of easy 
works and discussions of everyday topics. 



12 



Sp 301-302 Survey of Spanish Literature (3, 3) 

An historical and critical study of the most important literary 
movements and the most representative authors of Spanish 
literature from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Re- 
quired of Modern Language majors if Spanish is elected as 
one of their languages. 

Sp 303-304 Spanish and Latin-American Civilization 

(3,3) 
A study of the cultural contributions of Spain to Western 
Civilization and a general survey of the most characteristic 
movements of Iberoamerica. 

Sp 305 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3) 

Intensive training in correct expression in both written and 
spoken language. Oral and written reports on topics of Span- 
ish cultural and current interest. 

Sp 351 Spanish Drama of the Golden Age (3) 

An intensive study of Golden Age Drama, with special atten- 
tion to the works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina and 
Calderon de la Barca. 



Sp 353 Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel (3) 

Post Romantic narrative fiction as Spain's method of explor- 
ing her past and present. Among the authors studied are 
Valera, Pereda, Pardo Bazan and Galdos. 

Sp 355 The Generation of 1898 (3) 

Novels, essays, poetry and plays by the most important writ- 
ers of the turn of the century in Spain. A study of the ideologi- 
cal and literary contributions of Unamuno, Azorin, Baroja, 
Valle Inclan, Machado and others. 

Sp 356 Contemporary Spanish Novel (3) 

A study of the literary trends and the works of significant 
writers of Post Civil War Spain. Works of Cela, Laforet, 
Delibes, Gironella and others will be discussed. 

Sp 358 Contemporary Spanish Theatre (3) 

A study of the most important works of Casona, Buero Val- 
lejo, Sastre, Paso and others, as a reflection of some of the 
social problems of Contemporary Spain. 

Sp 499 Senior Project (0-3) 

Comp L 305-306 Comparative Romance Literature (3, 3) 

See course description on page 10. 



13 



Division of 
Humanities and Fine Arts 



Art 



ART HISTORY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS: 
Students majoring in the History of Art must take AS 101-102, 
Art 101-102; 10 upper division courses in the art department, 
of which at least 8 must be in Art History, including Art 401, 
completed with a grade of C or better and a satisfactory 
senior project. Students are recommended to have a sufficient 
language facility to be able to do serious research in German, 
French or Italian. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS: 
The Art Department also offers a minor in Art History to those 
students who complete a minimum of 15 credits in the depart- 
ment, distributed as follows: two semesters of general Survey 
of Art History, two semesters of upper division Art History 
courses, one semester of a studio course (selection guided 
by advisor). 



Art 101 History of Art (3) 

Prehistoric through Medieval; survey with readings in art 
history. 

Art 102 History of Art (3) 

Renaissance through Modern; survey with readings in art 
history. 

Art 301 Prehistoric Art (2) 

A study of art and culture from the Paleolithic through the 
Neolithic. 

Art 301 W Workshop for Prehistoric Art (1) 

Problems in aesthetics and techniques related to the study of 
prehistoric art. Required for those taking Art 301. 

Art 310 Japanese Art and Architecture (3) 

Survey of Japanese art including minor decorative arts. Not 
offered 1971-72. 

Art 311 Islamic Art (3) 

A study of the art and culture of Islam. 

Art 312 Pre-Columbian Art in Mexico and Central America 

(3) 
A study of these cultures and their art. 

Art 313 Art of Africa and Oceania (3) 

Art south of the Sahara and the islands of the South Pacific. 
Figures, masks, buildings and craftmanship. 

Art 316 Greek Art (2) 

A study of the development of Greek art primarily within the 
context of the development of cult centers. 

Art 316W Workshop for Greek Art (1) 

Recommended for those taking Art 316. 

Art 321 Medieval Architecture (3) 

The development of building types and the evolution of style 
from late antiquity through the High Gothic. 

Art 322 Medieval Painting, Sculpture and Decorative Art 

(3) 
The development of style and iconography from the early 
Middle Ages through the High Gothic. 

Art 331-332 Italian Renaissance Art (3, 3) 

Italian art of the fourteenth, fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. 



14 



Art 336 Renaissance in Northern Europe (3) 

Painting in Northern Europe from Late Gothic illuminating the 
work of Pieter Bruegel the Elder. 

Art 341 Roman Baroque (3) 

A study of the development of baroque forms in art and archi- 
tecture in and around Rome from the mid-sixteenth through 
the mid-seventeenth centuries. 

Art 342 Baroque Outside of Italy (3) 

A study of the assimilation of Roman baroque into the na- 
tional traditions of Germany, Flanders, Holland, Spain and 
France. 

Art 355 Art from Impressionism through 1920 (3) 

Art 357 Art Between the Wars, 1920-1940 (3) 

Art 358 Contemporary Art (3) 

Art from 1940 to the present. 

Art 363-364 History of American Movies (3, 3) 

A survey of the film with emphasis on its cultural and socio- 
logical significance. Includes an introduction to techniques 
necessary for film analysis. 

Art 365-366 Masculine/Feminine Images in American 

Movies in the 30s and 40's (3, 3) 
Intensive examination of selected stars from the period, in- 
cluding Garbo, Gable, Harlow and Bogart; study of their per- 
sonalities and of the technical means by which these person- 
alities were created and conveyed (script, lighting, composi- 
tion and camera work). Meaning of these personalities to the 
audience, changes in the male and female images of the late 
30's. Each movie will be screened twice and analyzed twice; 
student papers alternate with lectures. 

Prerequisite: Art 363-364 or general knowledge of movie 
history and technique, with permission of the instructor. The 
first semester will be taught at Boston College, the second at 
Newton College. 

Art 377 American Art and Architecture (3) 

Survey of American Art from Colonial to present times. 

Art 379 American Art Prior to the Civil War (3) 

Students not majoring in Art or American Studies need the 
permission of the instructor. Not offered 1971-72. 

Art 380 American Art from 1865 through the Present (3) 

Students not majoring in Art or American Studies need the 



permission of the instructor. Not offered 1971-72. 

Art 381 Departmental Studies in the Boston Museum of 
Fine Arts (3) 

Specialized studies in the various departments of the BMFA. 
Tours of the museum preceded by lectures. To be taught 
alternate years; open to all art majors and others with per- 
mission. 

Art 382 Departmental Studies in the Boston Museum of 
Fine Arts (3) 

Studies in the Far Eastern Department. Limited to 10 students, 
with permission of the instructor. 

Art 383-384 Philosophy of Art (3, 3) 

An introduction to theories of art and beauty in both eastern 
and western culture. An analysis of the creative act as it re- 
lates to aesthetics. 

Art 387-388 Art as Symbol (2, 2) 

A study of the nature and structure of symbol as developed in 
the psychology of Jung, followed by an analysis of the arts of 
various cultures and periods as attempts to give symbolic 
definition to man's relationship with the cosmos. Not offered 
1971-72. 

Art 387-388W Workshop for Art as Symbol (1,1) 
Mostly student-initiated projects. Required for those taking 
Art 387 or 388. 

Art 401 Seminar in Methods and Criticism (3) 

An analysis of different approaches to art (the formal, the 
iconographical, and the political) and a discussion of the 
bases for historical and modern criticism. Required of art 
history majors; open to juniors and seniors in the department 
and to others who have completed at least one semester of 
Art History beyond the Survey course. Offered alternate years. 

Art 497-498 Independent Studies in the History of Art 

(0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of in- 
dependent study will present a detailed description of the 
course requirements as agreed to by the instructor giving the 
course and as approved by a representative of the Dean's 
office. The student must successfully carry through the proj- 
ect as outlined. If these conditions are satisfied, the Indepen- 
dent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Independent 
Study course should be carried in any one semester. 



15 



Art 499 Senior Project (3) 

Required of all art history majors. 

STUDIO ART 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS: 
Students majoring in Art must take Art 101-102, AS 101-102; 
10 upper division courses (exclusive of senior project) in the 
Art Department of which at least six must be in studio, with 
a grade of C or better. Seniors should have prepared a port- 
folio of their best work and completed a satisfactory senior 
project. All Studio Art majors present their work at the end 
of each semester to a Review Board of faculty members and 
senior art majors for comments, criticism and direction. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS: 
The Art Department also offers a minor in Studio Art to those 
students who complete a minimum of 15 credits in the depart- 
ment with a grade of C or better distributed as follows: two 
semesters of Introductory Studio, three semesters of studio 
work, of which at least two should be upper division, or five 
semesters of studio work, of which at least three should be in 
the same area of specialization. Studio minors will participate 
in regular Review Boards, and their complete portfolio will 
be reviewed by the Art Faculty during their last semester at 
Newton; approval of their portfolio is essential to the granting 
of the minor. All courses are subject to limited enrollment. 

AS 101-102 Introductory Studio (3, 3) 

A series of interrelated courses designed to give the student 
acquaintance with various skills, techniques, media and view- 
points. 

AS 101a Drawing 

Freehand drawing: a direct interpretation of visual reality, 
natural as well as made, employing various media; investiga- 
tion of experimental techniques and approaches to drawing. 

AS 101b Design Research, Two-Dimensional 

Studio course to train student to visualize and represent the 
illusion of form, action, rhythm, structure and space, using 
line, tone, texture, as well as images, employing traditional 
media as well as experimentation with new materials. 

AS 102a Design Research, Three-Dimensional 
Workshop course to train the student to visualize in space and 
to develop a sensitivity to form, structure and balance, using 
ordinary materials in the forming process, coordinating mind, 
eye and hand with reference to the order of nature. 



AS 102b Painting 

Basic painting. Exploration of materials and techniques through 
problems in observation, texture, color, analysis of composi- 
tion, figure and landscape. Oil or acrylic. 

AS 103-104 Art Fundamentals (3, 3) 

A seminar-workshop to introduce the student with little art 
background to a variety of art experiences. 

AS 110 Media I (3) 

Design elements of texture, color, space, time and sequence 
as inherent in the projected image. A .35 mm. camera recom- 
mended, though not essential. 

AS 181 Color (3) 

Experience with and inquiry into the construction and design 
of color as a force. A studio course using colored paper, 
collage, found and prepared objects; a final project in any 
medium putting a chosen aspect of this knowledge to work. 
Required for or to be taken simultaneously with AS 303-304. 

AS 207-208 Figure Drawing I (2, 2) 

Studies from the model. Watercolor, ink, conte, charcoal, pen- 
cil and mixed media; composition and anatomy. 

AS 213 Basic Oil, Acrylic and Gouache Technique (2) 

Modeling and defining form in an opaque medium. 

AS 214 Picasso to Abstraction (2) 

A study of the approach of Picasso to painting as a guide to 
the formation of an abstract style. 

AS 217-218 Developmental Painting I (3,3) 
A studio course designed to allow the student to program a 
series of works that are relevant to the individual. The inten- 
tion of this study is to develop the capacity for arriving at in- 
dependent solutions. Oils, acrylic, watercolor or mixed media. 
It is helpful, though not required, to have taken AS 102b. 

AS 221 Drawing II (3) 

Structure in drawing by non-representational means. Practice 
in control and spontaneity through techniques of mental con- 
struction and psychic improvisation. 

AS 245-246 Environmental Design I (3, 3) 

Studio workshop course to train the student to see man as 
center and a measure of his environment; acquisition of tech- 
niques to represent and communicate by means of projection 
drawing, such as orthographic, isometric and perspective 
drawing, as well as the use of models. An introduction to the 



16 



design process as it relates to programming; requires criteria 
to solve specific environmental theoretical problems. 

AS 251-252 Ceramics— Hand Building (3, 3) 

Hand building techniques in clay. Coil and slab projects. 
Class limited, with permission of instructor. 

AS 253-254 Ceramics — Wheel Throwing (3, 3) 

Work on the potter's wheel. Prerequisite AS 251-252 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

AS 255-256 Weaving I (3, 3) 

An introduction to weaving as a medium of contemporary art. 
Exploration of weaving techniques used in the creation of 
accessories and wall hangings. Experimentation with pattern 
drafts, tapestry weaves, and different types of materials. With 
permission of the instructor. 

AS 261-262 Printmaking I (3, 3) 
Relief and stencil printing. A course in printing from raised 
surfaces and stencil templates. Use of wood, masonite and 
plastic; inking, printing and registration methods. 

AS 263-264 Etching (3, 3) 

Intaglio methods of printing with emphasis on etching. Study 
of the different effects produced by a variety of inks, papers, 
grounds, etc. Prerequisite: Drawing, or permission of the in- 
structor. 

AS 271 Basic Photography I (3) 

Aesthetic and technical principles of photography. The course 
will include practical fundamentals of using cameras and light 
meters and darkroom experience in developing, printing and 
enlarging pictures. Required: .35 mm. or 2V* camera, lens 
shade and some darkroom materials. 

AS 272 Basic Film Making I (3) 

Exploration of the expressive possibilities of film as an art 
medium through practical experiments in Super 8 mm. filming. 
Students will learn the basic techniques of film making. 

AS 275-276 Design Photography (3, 3) 

A course for artists and designers whose major interest in 
photography is self-expression. More concerned with the as- 
pects of selection, subjective expression and inventiveness 
than with the use of the camera as a recording apparatus. 
Because weather conditions and natural light cannot be con- 
trolled, darkroom projects will run concurrently with camera 
projects. Required of students: an adjustable camera, .35 
mm., 2Va or 4 x 5 and some darkroom materials. 



AS 278 Photojournalism (Alternate for Film Making) (3) 

An analysis of the relationship between pictures and text 
leading to the production of picture stories and photo-illus- 
trated texts. Most photography will be done outside the class- 
room. News and magazine photography oriented. Required: 
.35 mm. or 2 1 /4 camera, lens shade, light meter and some 
darkroom materials. 

AS 303 Serigraphy I (3) 

The techniques of screen construction, stencil making and 
multiple color printing. 

Prerequisite: AS 181 or taken simultaneously. 

AS 304 Serigraphy II (3) 

Utilization of technique. Problems concerning the possibilities 
of fabric, fine art and commercial application. 

Prerequisite: AS 303 or permission of the instructor. 

AS 307-308 Figure Drawing II (2, 2) 

Work in dry brush with emphasis on the modeling of the mus- 
culature and the forms of the human body. 

Prerequisite: minimum of one semester of AS 207-208. 

AS 317-318 Developmental Painting II (3, 3) 

Continuation of AS 217-218 on a more advanced level. 

AS 343-344 Advanced Design in Space (3, 3) 

Workshop course as a continuation of design research, two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional, on a more advanced level, 
with special emphasis to scale development from sketch to 
environmental realization at larger or human scale. 
Course open to 10 juniors and seniors. 

AS 345-346 Environmental Design II (3, 3) 

A continuation of workshop course Environmental Design I, 
applying knowledge in the solving of problems and to intro- 
duce students to various aspects of architecture and planning 
as tools for forming man's physical environment. 

AS 351-352 Ceramics (3, 3) 

Advanced work in hand building or wheel throwing. 
With permission of instructor. 

AS 355-356 Weaving II (3, 3) 

Emphasis on creation of original designs in tapestry weaves, 
multiple harness weaves and three-dimensional weaving. 
Prerequisite: Weaving I and permission of the instructor. 

AS 361-362 Printmaking II (3, 3) 

Advanced problems in printmaking. Choice of relief or intaglio 
methods. 



17 



AS 371-372 Photography II (3, 3) 

More advanced problems in photography, including color. 

AS 375-376 Vision (3, 3) 

A course to sharpen the student's ability to innovate, be open 
to and recognize discovery. Dialogue with other departments 
and instructors will be sought. 
Class limited to 15 students. 

AS 381-382 Space Problems — Tutorial (3, 3) 

Space problems solved, imaginative as well as specific; ex- 
hibition, theatrical and monumental, using models and actual 
space where possible. 

Limited to two or three seniors. 

AS 385-386 Advanced Tutorial I (3, 3) 

Intensive work in a specific area under the direction of a 
mentor. Students taking advanced tutorial should inform the 
Chairman in writing. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. To be 
taught each year; open to seniors majoring in Art. 

AS 485-486 Advanced Tutorial II (3, 3) 

Intensive work in a specific area under the direction of a 
mentor. No more than one area may be pursued simultane- 
ously. The work, though it may relate to the Senior Project, 
may not be submitted as a part of it. Students taking ad- 
vanced tutorial should inform the Chairman in writing. 
Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. 

AS 499 Senior Project (3) 

Required of all Studio Art majors. 

History 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS: 
Students majoring in history must fulfill the following require- 
ments with a grade of C or better: 36 credit hours which must 
include His 101 or 102 and a senior project to be completed 
in an area of the student's choice. Students planning to at- 
tend graduate school are reminded of the advisability of 
choosing their courses with this in mind. This should involve 
an indication of some special field of interest, as well as 
appropriate allied courses which will aid in the further study 
of history. 

The department recommends a seminar course in history 
for all of its students. All majors should submit their proposed 
schedule of courses to the department chairman prior to the 
semester registration. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS: 
The History Department also offers a minor in history to those 
students who complete 15 credit hours with a grade of C or 
better. 

His 101-102 Problems in European History (3, 3) 

Analyzes some of the forces, movements and issues which 
have played a large part in the formation of European civiliza- 
tion. The first semester will cover the period from the Greeks 
to the early modern period; the second semester will cover 
the modern and contemporary periods. The approach to the 
course will be topical and analytical rather than narrative. 
One class meeting a week will consist of discussion. The 
student will be introduced through the study of problems to 
the various approaches to the study of history. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores. One semester required 
of history majors. 

His 104 World History since 1500 (3) 

Analyzes the essential characteristics and experiences of the 
major world regions and those forces or movements, particu- 
larly western expansion, that had a world-wide impact. A 
global perspective of the world since 1500, rather than a 
regional or national view, is the aim of this course. Offered 
1972-73. 

His 203-204 Political and Economic History of the United 
States (3, 3) 

Describes and analyzes the evolution of American society 
with emphasis on those cultural forces which have helped to 
promote social change. 

Students will be required to read independently in order to 
develop a command of historical fact and theory as well as 
an appreciation of the development of American civilization. 

His 205-206 Social and Cultural History of the United 
States (3, 3) 

Analyzes the evolution of American society from colonial times 
to the present. What Americans thought about themselves and 
their problems and their response to new ideas of science 
and social criticism, the development of mass culture and 
other social and cultural foundations of modern America. The 
first semester deals with America to 1900 and the second se- 
mester considers the twentieth century. 



18 



His 207-208 History of East Asia (3, 3) 

An introduction to the history and civilization of China and 
Japan, with emphasis on cultural development and social or- 
ganization. First semester covers from earliest times to about 
1800. Second semester focuses on a comparative study of 
"modernization" in China and Japan. 

His 332-333 Origins and Rise of Europe (3, 3) 

An inquiry into the socio-cultural and ideologic foundations 
and operative factors in the formation of the European world 
from Constantine the Great to 1500. 

His 341 Emergence of the Nation States (3) 

A study of the development of the European national states 
from 1500 through the age of Louis XIV. The political effect 
of the Reformation, the nature and effects of the new econ- 
omy, the scientific thought of the seventeenth century and 
the expansions and secularization of the European world. 

His 342 The Age of Rationalism (3) 

A study of the internal development of the major European 
States in the eighteenth century; the international balance of 
power; the rise of the great colonial empires; the Enlighten- 
ment as a European phenomenon. 

His 343 Revolutionary Europe (3) 

This course will deal with the political, social and intellectual 
facets of the European revolutionary movements from 1789 to 
1848. Although the French Revolution of 1789 will be studied 
in detail, great emphasis will also be placed on its general 
impact on European civilization through the Restoration pe- 
riod especially in Italy and Germany. 

His 344 Europe in the Age of Realpolitik (3) 
The development of the effects of nationalism, socialism, and 
industrialism on Europe from 1848 to 1914. The great unifica- 
tions, the rise of Marxian socialism, the new imperialism and 
the impact of the shift from romanticism to realism in politics 
will be considered. 

His 345 Europe Between the Wars (3) 

A study of the major political, intellectual and socio-economic 
trends in Europe from 1914 to 1939; the impact of war, the 
rise of the totalitarian right, the impact on Europe of Soviet 
Russia. 



His 346 Contemporary Europe (3) 

Major developments in European history since 1939 will be 
analyzed and discussed in their historical context; the prob- 
lems occasioned by World War II, the Cold War, the decline 
of empire, variations in Marxist societies will be among the 
topics studied. 

His 353 History of Modern France (3) 

Study of basic problems in French history since 1848. The 
Second Empire, the Third and Fourth Republics, DeGaulle's 
France will be considered against their social, economic and 
cultural background and the changing role of France in 
Europe. 

His 361-362 Communist Chinese History and Society 

(3,3) 
An introduction to Chinese Communist society, covering the 
period from the rise of the Communist Party in China to the 
present. First semester will give special attention to the causes 
of the Chinese revolution, the rise of the Communist Party, 
and the evolution of Maoist revolutionary strategy. Second 
semester will focus on the recent "cultural revolution" and 
on following current Chinese affairs. 

His 363 Twentieth Century Russian History (3) 

Russian history from 1905 until the death of Stalin, with spe- 
cial attention given to the Russian revolution, the Comintern 
and Soviet Far Eastern policy. 

His 364 Southeast Asian History (3) 

A survey of the history and civilization of several Southeast 
Asian countries, with a case study to investigate the effects 
of colonialism on a traditional society. 

His 370 Colonial America, 1607-1763 (3) 

An intensive historical examination of the origins, nature, 
problems and relevancy of the political, economic, social and 
cultural systems of early America. This is a reading and dis- 
cussion course with maximum student participation. 

His 371 America in the Middle Period, 1800-1850 (3) 

A study of American political, social, economic and intellec- 
tual developments from the "Jeffersonian Revolution" of 1800 
through the influences of "Jacksonian Democracy". 



19 



His 372 The American Revolution 1763-1789 (3) 

An intensive examination of the causes, consequences, mo- 
tives and meaning of the American Revolution. Reviewed also 
will be the changing historical interpretation and recent re- 
appraisals of the Revolutionary Generation. The Confedera- 
tion period will be examined in relation to the themes of 
change and continuity. 

This is a reading and discussion course with maximum stu- 
dent participation. 

His 373 The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877 

(3) 
A study of the causes, conduct and aftermath of the Civil 
War. The course will consider political, economic, social, in- 
tellectual, military and diplomatic phenomena. 

His 375-376 American Foreign Policy (3, 3) 

An historical study of the formulation and implementation of 
a basic United States foreign policy from 1776 to 1900 and 
the subsequent new departures occasioned by the many radi- 
cally different challenges of the twentieth century. Emphasis 
will be placed on conflicting interpretations. 

His 377-378 Twentieth Century America (3, 3) 

An historical examination of the growth of the American na- 
tion from a semirural to a highly urbanized society and the 
American political response to this challenge of change. Im- 
portant topics include: origins, nature and significance of the 
Progressive Movement; the ethnic and economic orientated 
politics of the twenties; Depression; New Deal; rise of the 
new mass-production-consumption economy; the second re- 
construction and welfare statism from Truman to Johnson. 

Appropriate reading assignments comprise an integral part 
of this course. 

His 379 American Constitutional Development (3) 

An historical study of the origins of the American constitu- 
tional system (1607-1789); the nature of the federal union and 
who had the power to interpret the constitution (1789-1865) 
and the problems and adjustments of the constitutional sys- 
tem arising from the challenges of a modern, industrialized 
urban society (1865-Present). 

His 381-382 The Black Man in American History (3, 3) 

Fall Semester: 1501 to 1877, from Negro slavery in the West 
Indies to the end of the Reconstruction period in the United 
States. Spring Semester: 1877 to the present time from the 
beginnings of hard core segregation to the continuing strug- 
gles for full acceptance and equality. 



His 401-402 Seminar in European History (3, 3) 

Analysis of the writings of major Western historians of the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries in the light of contempo- 
rary historiographical theory. 

His 497-498 Independent Study in History (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the pro- 
fessor giving the course and as approved by a representative 
of the Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Indepen- 
dent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

His 499 Senior Project (3) 

Required of all majors. 

Music 

Mus 101 Basic Theory of Music (4) 

An introduction to the study of music history. 
Not offered 1971-72. 

Mus 105-106 Learn to Listen (2, 2) 

A course designed to enable students to become informed 
music listeners by acquainting them with great examples of 
the literature of all periods, placing special emphasis on 
musical forms. 

Mus 207 Music in Film (3) 

The importance of music to movies is studied in a course that 
views, discusses and analyses selected films from 1929 to 
1971. 

Mus 208 Opera (3) 

The study of opera as a living art. 

Required opera attendance will be equivalent to the third 
hour of class. 

Mus 253-254 Beethoven's Instrumental Works (3, 3) 

Beethoven's instrumental works; the influence of his life and 
times on his development, a review of musical forms as they 
are encountered in these works. The student should register 
for the full course and will be required to take oral as well as 
written examinations at the end of each term. 

Prerequisite: Mus 101 or the equivalent, with permission of 
the instructor. 



20 



Philosophy 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS: 
For a major in philosophy, the requirements are as follows: a 
minimum grade of C in 12 courses and/or seminars in the 
Department of Philosophy, including at least one course or 
seminar in each of the following areas: 

(1) Logic (2) History of Philosophy and Modern Philosophy 
(3) Ethics (4) Problems of Philosophy: issue-oriented 
courses and seminars (5) Problems of Philosophy: man- 
oriented courses and seminars*. 



•The course numbers indicate the level of the courses as well as the area 
in which they fall: 

The first digit indicates the following levels: 1 — Elementary; 2 & 3 — 
Intermediate; 4 — Advanced. 

The second digit indicates the following areas: 1 — Logic; 2 — History of 
Philosophy and Modern Philosophy; 3 — Ethics; 4 — Problems of Philosophy: 
issue-oriented courses and seminars; 5 — Problems of Philosophy: man- 
oriented courses and seminars. 

The third digit indicates the semester a course is taught: 1 — first semes- 
ter; 2 — second semester. 



using behavior, the nature of language, meaning and com- 
munication, special types of discourse. Detailed practice in 
interpretation and inference. Deductive and inductive methods 
in argumentation, critical analysis and practical decision. The 
logic of propositions and classes; truth-functional analysis; 
quantification; proofs of validity and soundness of arguments. 
Inductive procedures; analogical arguments; probability in- 
ferences. Phil 111, first semester, is offered in consecutive 
years. Phil 112, second semester, is offered in alternate years. 

Phil 117-118 Logic (3) 

A study of the operations of the human mind — abstraction, 
judgment and reasoning — with emphasis on the practical ap- 
plication of the law of logic. Exercises will be assigned which 
should aid the student in her search for clarity of thought and 
expression. 

This course will be offered twice each year. Phil 118 is the 
equivalent of 117 but is offered in the spring semester. 

Phil 121 History of Philosophy I (3) 

Pre-Socrates to Locke. 



An acceptable senior project. 

Students should consult the department at the beginning of 
each semester in preparing their programs. Those planning 
to pursue graduate study in philosophy are strongly advised 
to take the following courses: Phil 317; Phil 321; Phil 323; 
Phil 325; Phil 326; Phil 343; Phil 344. They are also advised 
to acquire the reading knowledge of a foreign language 
(preferably French or German) and to take the Graduate 
Record Examination at the end of their Junior year or at 
the beginning of their Senior year. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS: 
For a minor in philosophy the requirements are as follows: a 
minimum grade of C in 6 courses and/or seminars in the 
Department of Philosophy, including at least one course or 
seminar in 3 of the 5 areas required for majors. 

Phil 111-112 Logical Techniques of Thought and Argu- 
ment (3, 3) 

The aim is to provide a nontechnical introduction to the 
principles and methods of sound reasoning. Topics include 
the uses and functions of language, symbolism and sign- 



Phil 122 History of Philosophy II (3) 

Locke to Present. 

An introduction to some of the basic ideas of the main 
philosophers in the history of Western thought. Stress will be 
placed on problems pertinent to the contemporary world. The 
class will read the same primary sources and groups within 
the class will read different secondary sources, then compare 
them in relation to the primary sources. 

Phil 142 Philosophical Method: Its Nature and Appli- 
cations (3) 

A study of the main characteristics, problems and the con- 
tinuing challenges of philosophical inquiry. The integrative 
and critical values in the application of the philosophical 
method: (a) for the assessment of the intellectual products of 
our civilization in a variety of areas (including morality, poli- 
tics, religion, social and natural sciences, etc.), and (b) for 
the formulation of one's personal concepts, beliefs, and views. 
Through readings in diverse fields, an attempt will be made to 
exhibit what may be called the rationale in appraising the 
problems of a broad relevance to human concerns. The course 
will be conducted as a seminar. 



21 



Phil 155 Philosophy of Man (3) 

The study of man as creative and dynamic. His place and role 
in the evolutionary process. The features of his response to 
the shaping of the world around him. The different kinds of 
knowledge as ways of relating to reality. The problematic of 
interpersonal relations. The search for personal authenticity. 
The role of commitment, responsibility and community in this 
search. The tension between the individual and the institu- 
tional. The following thinkers will be read and discussed in 
working out the above problems: Teilhard de Chardin, Johann, 
Bergson, Descartes, Einstein, Kant, Fletcher, Sartre, Maslow, 
Marcel, Berdyaev and others. At the end of the course each 
student will be asked to formulate, in a synthesis, her own 
philosophy of man. 

Phil 225-226 History of Modern Philosophy (3, 3) 

Systematic study and critical analysis of the main works of 
the following philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Ber- 
keley, Hume, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, and Schopenhauer. 

Fall semester: Ethics and Value Theory. 

Spring semester: Theory of Knowledge. 

The second semester may be taken without the first. 

Phil 232 Values and Contemporary Man (3) 

Contemporary man's search for values in a rapidly changing 
world where traditional values are collapsing will be investi- 
gated mainly through the media of literature, film and art. 

Phil 234 Philosophy of the Community (3) 

A study of the communities of friendship, marriage, family, 
state, nation and church, and of their relations to one another. 

Phil 236 Utopias and Communes in America (3) 

An inquiry into the ideals of the Utopian communities of 18th 
and 19th Century America: the Shakers, Owen's New Har- 
mony, Fruitland, Brook Farm and the Oneida Perfectionists, 
as well as those of today's varied communal experiments. 

Phil 237 Contemporary Problems in Social Philosophy 

(3) 
An examination of the philosophical and moral doctrines in- 
volved in such social conceptions as utility, the common good, 
natural law and natural rights, justice and equality, tolerance 
and liberty. 

Phil 238 Problems in Ethics and the Philosophy of Mind 

(3) 
A study of the current ideas concerning man's moral conduct 
in the light of his intellectual commitments, as interpreted by 



some major philosophers and moralists — the British Utili- 
tarians, Butler, Kant, Moore, Stevenson, Ross, Baier, Perry, 
Hare, and others. 

Phil 241 Philosophy of Religion (3) 

A phenomenological approach to the meaning of religion, 
with stress placed on some of the epistemological problems 
of religion, and a study of some of the answers given by psy- 
chology and mysticism. An attempt will be made to discover 
the relation of metaphysics to religion. 

Phil 251 Philosophy of Creativity (3) 

An inquiry into the possibility of a new philosophy of man 
based on his essential creativity. Extensive study of the ideas 
of thinkers who discuss man's new responsibility as creator 
of the world around him and his creative responsibility to his 
fellow men. The ideas of Berdyaev, Maslow, Kierkegaard, 
Erich Fromm, Sartre, Alan Watts and Gabriel Marcel on this 
subject will be investigated. 

Phil 256 Contemporary Problems Seminar (3) 

This seminar will be given by professors from the Art and the 
Philosophy departments. Its purpose is to enable the students 
and the professors involved in it to discuss together in depth 
and in breadth challenging contemporary problems common 
to the two disciplines, such as the person and the community, 
responsibility and creativity. The seminar will focus on one 
central problem each year. Selected problem for 1971-72: 
Methods of self-knowledge. Many people today have not been 
able to satisfactorily identify with traditional Western answers 
to the question "Who am I?" This course proposes to examine 
various means being used today to find answers to this ques- 
tion. Emphasis will be placed on experiencing the various 
methods and discussion will be based mostly on reflection on 
these experiences. 

Phil 317 Symbolic Logic (3) 

Introduction to the current methods of formal logic and logical 
analysis. The theory of truth functions and propositional 
calculus; normal schemata and Boolean expansions; duality; 
proofs of consistency and validity. Properties, development, 
and interpretation of axiomatic theories (logistic systems). 
Calculus of functions: uniform quantification and methods of 
natural deduction; general theory of quantification. Introduc- 
tion of the theories of identity, classes, and relations. Theory 
of descriptions. Logical and semantical paradoxes. Applica- 
tions in the analysis of argumentative prose. 

This course presupposes no specialized training in logic 
and mathematics. 



22 



Phil 321 Plato and Aristotle (3) 

A study of some of the major works of these philosophers in 
the light of contemporary problems. 

Phil 322 Augustine — Thomas (3) 

A study of some of the major works of these philosophers in 
the light of contemporary problems. 

Phil 323 The French Spiritualistic School (3) 

The reaction of French philosophers to the positivism of 
Condillac, Comte and Spencer. The spiritualism of Pascal, 
Maine de Biran and Lachelier. The spiritual positivism of 
Ravaisson, Boutroux, Bergson and Teilhard de Chardin. 
Bergson's theory of creative evolution and Teilhard's evolu- 
tionary world view from cosmogenesis to christogenesis will 
be emphasized. 

Phil 325 American Philosophy (3) 

Jonathan Edwards to Sidney Hook. General historical trends, 
together with an analysis of the principal texts of William 
James, Josiah Royce, John Dewey and Alfred North White- 
head. 

Phil 326 Existentialism (3) 

The well known European Existentialists: Kierkegaard, 
Berdyaev, Heidegger, Gabriel Marcel, Camus, Sartre and 
Simone de Beauvoir. Existentialism in the United States. 
Selected readings from the novels, the plays and the philo- 
sophical essays of these writers. 

Phil 327-328 History and Philosophy of Science (3, 3) 

An examination of man's recent attempts, in their cultural 
contexts, to understand the physical environment. Historical 
and critical study of the development of modern scientific 
methods and fundamental concepts in natural and behavioral 
sciences. Topics include: (a) the development of the concepts 
of matter, force, energy, and dynamics; structure and func- 
tion; emergence, evolution, and natural selection; behaviorism 
and purposivism; (b) types of explanation; verification; causal- 
ity; theory making and concept formation; reduction; meas- 
urement; the nature of explanations of human actions. 

This course presupposes no specialized background in 
science and is intended both for those who do not expect to 
take further work in science or related subjects and for those 
who may wish to continue in the natural or the behavioral 
sciences. 

The second semester may be taken without the first with 
the consent of the instructor. 



Phil 342 Philosophical Presuppositions of Contemporary 
America (3) 

Besides contemporary philosophical works, plays, movies, 
novels, editorials, popular songs and publications of different 
political movements will be used in an attempt to bring to 
the surface some of the basic philosophical positions at work 
in present day thought. Majors from different disciplines will 
be especially helpful in this undertaking. 

Phil 343-344 Philosophy of Language (3, 3) 

A detailed study of the nature and uses of language in order 
to develop a viable philosophical method of analysis. Sym- 
bolism, meaning and use, sign-using behavior, and special 
types of discourse. The use of the philosophical method based 
on a linguistic conception of philosophy to achieve results on 
such subjects as mind, behavior, morals, understanding, cer- 
tainty, and belief. The decisive and dominant influence of this 
philosophical method on the current Anglo-American philoso- 
phy. Readings in the major works of Wittgenstein, Wisdom, 
Anscombe, Geach, Malcolm, Ryle, Austin, and others. 

Phil 345 Far Eastern Philosophies (3) 

An introduction to the study of Far Eastern philosophies: the 
Analects of Confucius; the Tao-Te-Ching; the Upanishads; 
the Bhagavad Gita and critical works concerning them. Di- 
rected study of the following contemporary thinkers at the 
student's choice: Daisetz; Suzuki (Zen Buddhism); Mahatma 
Gandhi; Rabindranath Tagore. 

Phil 346 Existentialism and Buddhism (3) 

A comparison of the ideas of Gabriel Marcel and of Martin 
Heidegger to Buddhism and to Zen Buddhism. Intensive study 
of both Western and Eastern sources. 

Phil 347-348 Seminar in Philosophy in Literature (3, 3) 

An investigation of philosophical insights concerning the 
problems, the conduct, and the condition of human life, as 
they appear in a selection of literary and philosophical works. 
Members of the seminar will select the works to be discussed 
and the reading list will be open to revision during the course 
of the seminar. The emphasis will be on discussion. The 
seminar will require a strong intellectual motivation of its 
members and their close interaction within the group. An 
attempt will be made to conduct this seminar interdepart- 
mentally whenever possible. 

Fall semester: Topic: Issues in a New Generation, including 
revolution, violence, war, civil disobedience, drugs, technology 



23 



and religious freedom. Selection of readings in: Marcuse, 
Paz, Guevara, Westermarck, Wellman, Bentham, Mill, Machia- 
velli, Hitler, Marx. 

Spring semester: Topic: Ethical Perspectives and Moral 
Dilemmas in the Problem of Freedom. Selection of readings 
in: Sophocles, Kalidasa, Dante, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Camus, 
Kierkegaard, Sartre, Kafka, Gandhi, Niebuhr, Bergson, Hem- 
ingway, Faulkner, Joyce. 

Two two-hour discussions weekly. The second semester 
may be taken without the first. 

Phil 410 Mathematical Logic (3) 

Completeness proof of quantification theory. Existence and 
singular inference; identity; descriptions. Number axioms and 
informal proofs. Classes and axiomatic set theory. Relations 
and functions. Variant theories of classes and ultimate classes. 
Mathematical induction. Analysis of foundations of mathe- 
matics: formalism, intuitionism, logicism. Paradoxes: Russell's; 
Grelling; Skolem; Burali-Forti. Theory of Types and possible 
solutions of paradoxes. Modal logic and necessity. Introduc- 
tion to many-valued logics. Applications and theory of logic. 
Prerequisite: Phil 317 or the consent of the instructor. 

Phil 441 Philosophy Seminar: Minds, Machines, and Pur- 
posive Behavior (3) 

A philosophical study of the comparative behavior of minds 
and machines with special reference to the concepts of pur- 
pose and intentional action. Determinism and freedom; goal- 
directed behavior, purposivism, and behaviorism. 

Phil 497-498 Independent Study in Philosophy (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor giving the course and as approved by a representa- 
tive of the Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that In- 
dependent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Inde- 
pendent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

Phil 499 Senior Project (3) 

Required of all Philosophy majors. 



Division of 
Science and Mathematics 



Division of Science and Mathematics 



BIOLOGY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Bio 101-102, Bio 301-302, Bio 303, Bio 305, Bio 404, Bio 
409-410. At least one elective course must be taken from any 
of the other biology offerings. Required related courses for 
majors: Chem 101-102, Chem 205-206, and Physics 111-112. 
It is strongly recommended that those students planning to go 
to medical or graduate school in science take a year of 
calculus (Math 151-152). Majors are required to complete a 
minimum of 23 credits with a grade of C or better beyond the 
Bio 101-102 level. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
Bio 101-102 Cell to Organism (4,4) 
12 credits beyond the introductory level 

Bio 301-302 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis (4, 4) 
Bio 303 General Genetics 



24 



Bio 404 Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology 

PRE-MEDICAL STUDIES 

A pre-medical student should make out her program in her 
Freshman year with the advice of the Director of Science, and 
in accordance with the entrance requirements of the medical 
schools to which she intends to apply. 



Freshman Year 

Sophomore Year 

Junior Year 
Senior Year 



First Semester 
Bio 101 
Chem 101 
Math 111 
Bio 301 
Chem 205 
Physics 111 
Bio 303 
Bio 305 
Bio 409 



Second Semester 
Bio 102 
Chem 102 
Math 112 
Bio 302 
Chem 206 
Physics 112 
Bio 404 
Bio (elective*) 
Bio 410 



* Any one of the following may be selected as an elective: 
Bio 304, Bio 306, Bio 307, Bio 406, Bio 408. 

Majors are to consult with the Director of Science for 
assignment to a permanent major adviser. 

Bio 101-102 Cell to Organism (4,4) 
Study of the patterns of organization through which mole- 
cules, organelles, cells and tissues give living organisms 
their basic properties. Fall semester: cell biology integrated 
with the elements of biochemistry and cell physiology. Spring 
semester: principles of developmental biology, whereby the 
information from genetic material is translated into form and 
function during the individual life spans of plants and animals. 
Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. 

Bio 301-302 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis 

(4,4) 
A comparative morphological and embryologlcal study of the 
vertebrates. Evolutionary changes in vertebrate structure from 
the protochordates through representative members of all the 
vertebrate classes will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on 
understanding the underlying principles behind these morpho- 
genetic events. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratories. 

Bio 303 General Genetics (3) 

The principles of genetics and their relation to fundamental 
biological problems. Discussion of the molecular basis of 
heredity, the nature, transmission and action of higher plants, 
animals, and microorganisms. Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory. 



Bio 304 Topics in Advanced Genetics (3) 

This course is designed for students who have taken Bio 303 
and who wish to deepen their knowledge in some of the 
problems of genetic research today. Each student will pursue 
an independent study of a topic of her choice. She will then 
submit a complete bibliography of the subject and present a 
paper for discussion by the whole classs. 

Bio 305 Histology (4) 

The microscopic anatomy of tissues as related to function. 
This will include classical methods of study as well as modern 
research techniques. Three lectures and one two-hour labora- 
tory. 

Bio 306 Advanced Histological Technique (4) 

A laboratory oriented course. Includes techniques used in 
investigation of problems in cell biology, photomicrography, 
tissue culture, phase contrast microscopy, cryobiology, histo- 
chemical enzyme studies, exfoliative cytology and autoradi- 
ography. 

Bio 307 Experimental Biology (4) 

A laboratory oriented course concerned with selected basic 
methods, techniques, and instruments used in experimental 
biology. 

Bio 404 Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology (4) 

A biochemical and biophysical approach to the cell as the 
biological common denominator. Includes cell physiology of 
both plants and animals. 

Bio 406 Vertebrate Physiology (3) 

A systematic approach to functions of organs and organ 
systems in the vertebrates with special emphasis on regula- 
tory mechanism and reproductive physiology. 

Bio 408 Endocrinology (3) 

A review of the general and comparative aspects of endo- 
crinology. 

Bio 409-410 Senior Research (6) 

All students will present a senior paper on their research 
supervised by the staff. Seniors should consult with a faculty 
member concerning their senior thesis and submit an outline 
of the thesis to the department for approval by the third 
Thursday in October. The outline should give the objective 
and how that objective will be accomplished. The outline 
should be signed by the faculty advisor. The department will 
review the outline and recommend appropriate action. 



25 



Bio 497-498 Independent Study (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. The student must carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Indepen- 
dent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

Bio 499 Senior Project (0-3, 0-3) 
In place of a comprehensive examination and a senior essay, 
there will be henceforth a single requirement — the senior 
project. The student is expected to initiate her own project 
which may take the form of an extended study of some one 
topic or participation and seminar — consult with division 
chairman for fuller detail. 



CHEMISTRY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

First Semester 



Freshman Year 



Sophomore Year 



Junior Year 



Senior Year 



Math 151 
Physics 101 
Chem 201 
Chem 203 
Math 201 or 011 
Chem 301 
Chem 303 
Chem 305 
Chem 401 



Second Semester 
Math 152 
Physics 102 
Chem 202 
Chem 204 

Chem 302 
Chem 304 
Chem 306 
Chem 402 



The senior year class work represents the senior compre- 
hensive synthesis. It offers flexibility through choice of topics. 

A grade of C or better is required for courses 301 and 
above. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

Chem 101-102 Principles of Modern Chemistry (4, 4) 

12 credits beyond the introductory level: 

Required: Chem 205: Introduction to Organic Chemistry (4) 

Chem 206: Organic Compounds of Biological Interest (4) 

The other 4 credits may be acquired in any of the following 

ways: 

Chem 301: Physical Methods of Analysis (4) 

Chem 303: Thermodynamics (4) 

Chem 401: Senior seminar (3) in combination with one 
semester of independent studies with number of credits de- 
pending on type of work performed. 



Chem 201-202 Introductory Inorganic and Physical Chem- 
istry (3, 3) 
Study of the fundamental laws of chemistry, atomic and 
molecular structure, theory of bonding, application to inor- 
ganic compounds. Introduction to thermodynamics. Thermo- 
chemistry. 3 lectures. 

Chem 203 Qualitative Analysis of Inorganic Compounds 

(D 
Analysis of anions and cations, their separation and identifi- 
cation. One three-hour laboratory. 

Chem 204 Quantitative Volumetric and Gravimetric Analy- 
sis (1) 

Acid-base titrations, precipitation and oxidation-reduction 
titrations. Complex reactions. One three-hour laboratory. 

Chem 301 Physical Methods of Analysis (4) 

A study of physical methods of separation used by the 
chemist, including various methods of extraction, chromatog- 
raphy, potentiometric and spectrometric determinations, both 
qualitative and quantitative, elucidation of structure. 

Chem 302 Introduction to Quantum and Radiochemistry 

(3) 
Introduction to the fundamentals of quantum chemistry. A 
study of the properties and reactions of the nucleus. The 
measurement of radiation and the effects of radiation on both 
inorganic and organic substances. Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site: Phy 102 and Chem 202. 

Chem 303 Thermodynamics (4) 

A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their applications 
in relation to energy changes and predicability of reactions. 
Four hour lectures, including problem sessions. 

Chem 304 Kinetics and Electrochemistry (4) 

A study of reaction rate, equilibrium in ideal and non-ideal 
systems. Principles of electrochemistry, their relationship to 
energy and thermodynamics. Four lectures including problem 
sessions requiring calculus. 

Chem 305-306 Physical Organic Chemistry (6-6) 
A study of reactions mechanisms based on thermodynamical 
and thermochemical processes. Elucidation of organic molec- 
ular structures. Introduction to molecular orbital calculations. 
Four lectures and one four-hour laboratory. Multistep syn- 
thesis, physical methods of determination of molecular struc- 
ture. 

Corequisites: Chem 303-304 



26 



Chem 401 Senior Seminar (3) 

Weekly sessions designed to acquaint the student with the 
scientific literature and to teach critical reading, experiment 
planning, as well as scientific writing and oral presentation of 
papers followed by discussion. 

Chem 497-498 Independent Studies in Chemistry (0-3, 

0-3) 
The student will present a typewritten detailed description of 
a project the choice of which will meet the instructor's ap- 
proval. Only successfully completed project will carry aca- 
demic credit. 

Prerequisite: instructor's consent; Dean's Office approval. 

Chem 499 Senior Project (3) 

The following courses are open to non-chemistry majors: 
Chem 101-102 Principles of Modern Chemistry (4, 4) 

A study of the fundamentals of chemistry including theory of 
solutions, colloids, acids, bases, buffers and pH, chemical 
equilibrium with introduction to kinetics. The laboratory will 
include applications of these principles, as well as a study of 
the fundamental tools of the chemist. Three lectures, one 
three-hour laboratory. 

Chem 205-206 Introductory Organic Chemistry (4, 4) 

A study of the various functional groups, their reactions. 
Applications of the study of reactions to polyfunctional com- 
pounds. The laboratory will include simple syntheses as well 
as some analytical work for the determination of the presence 
or absence of the various functional groups. Three lectures, 
one three-hour laboratory. 

MATHEMATICS 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Math 202, 301, 303 plus 5 semester courses at the upper 
division level (courses numbered above 300). 

Students who intend to major in Mathematics are advised to 
study one of the following languages: Russian, German, or 
French. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
Three semester courses at the upper division level or its 
equivalent, subject to the approval of the department. 

Students interested in Computer Science are advised to 
consider Math 015-016, Math 113-114, Math 307-308, and 
Math 309. 



Any course listed below is open to any qualified student. 

Math 011-012 Old Paths and New Ways (2, 2) 

A one semester course designed to give students interested 
in teaching elementary mathematics an insight into some 
basic mathematical concepts and some innovative ways of 
communicating them. Open to students with limited mathe- 
matical backgrounds. A student may take Math 011 or Math 
012 or both. (Math 012 does not depend on Math 011.) 

Math 013-014 Seminar and Practicum in the Teaching of 

Mathematics (2, 2) 
The seminar provides an opportunity for students interested 
in teaching Mathematics to explore the mathematical back- 
ground of ideas to be presented in the classroom, to work 
out innovative mini-courses, and/or to evaluate their observa- 
tions or teaching the logical development of mathematical 
ideas. Requirement: Permission of the instructor. A student 
may take Math 013 or Math 014 or both. (Math 014 does not 
depend on Math 013.) 

Math 015-016 Dialogues About Mathematics (0-4, 0-4) 
A seminar that offers an opportunity for interested students 
and faculty members within and without the department to 
share in a learning experience in some area of Mathematics 
or in some area related to Mathematics. The defining of a 
problem, the determination of the goals and the methodology 
and procedures to be followed, and the evaluation of the 
experience will be determined by the participants in conjunc- 
tion with the coordinator. Each participant who contracts to 
contribute to the learning experience will be granted the 
credit (up to three credits) agreed upon, usually on a pass/fail 
basis, if the contract is satisfactorily fulfilled. Possible con- 
tracts might involve individualized learning about computers 
or an area in which a student wishes to acquire knowledge or 
group discussions about a topic such as the relationship 
between pure and applied mathematics. Open to Freshmen. 
Suggested for students interested in studying computer sci- 
ence or any area of mathematics in a non-structured situation. 
A student may take Math 015 or Math 016 or both. (Math 016 
does not depend on Math 015.) 



27 



Math 101-102 Introduction to Analysis (5, 5) 

A rigorous study of the concepts of function, limit, derivative 
and integral. 

Math 111-112 Calculus (4, 4) 

A course in calculus which parallels Math 101-102. Problems 
and applications in the Natural Sciences are used to intro- 
duce the concepts. Recommended to students majoring in 
Sciences. Freshmen who are considering a major in Mathe- 
matics can elect Math 111-112 as an alternate to Math 101- 
102. 

Math 113-114 Mathematics for Behavioral Sciences (3,3) 
A study of mathematical topics for further work in Behavioral 
Sciences. This will include probability, statistics, introduction 
to and use of calculating machines and computers. 

Math 115-116 Mathematical Experiences (3, 3) 

The objectives of the course are an understanding of what 
mathematics is and an appreciation of mathematics as a 
vital, ongoing creation. Ideas — not content — will be stressed. 
Open-ended problems will provide opportunities for the dis- 
covery of mathematical relationships and the development of 
an interest in proving conjectures and theorems. Suggested 
for Freshmen and for non-mathematics majors with an interest 
in Mathematics. A student may take Math 115 or Math 116 or 
both. (Math 116 does not depend on Math 115.) 

Math 117-118 Mathematical Experiences for Teachers 

(3,3) 
Students taking Math 117 meet for two hours with students 
taking Math 115. (Math 118 is similarly related to Math 116.) 
During the third hour the emphasis will be on the communica- 
tion, in a teaching situation of the ideas developed during the 
course. A student may take Math 117 or Math 118 or both. 
(Math 118 does not depend on Math 117.) 

Math 120 Elementary Linear Algebra (3) 

An introductory level presentation of the fundamental con- 
cepts of linear algebra- — vector spaces, matrices, linear trans- 
formations of the plane. Some applications will be considered. 
Suggested for Freshmen and for non-mathematics majors 
interested in the social or natural sciences or in teaching. 

Math 121 Survey of Calculus (3) 

Topics in calculus with applications in Economics. 

Math 122 Elementary Statistics (3) 

Introduction to Statistics with applications and examples in 
Economics and Sociology. 



Math 201 Intermediate Analysis (5) 

A study of elementary differential equations, sequences, 
series, improper integrals, and sequences and series of 
functions. 

Math 202 Linear Algebra (5) 

A rigorous study of vector spaces, linear transformations, 
matrices, systems of linear equations, operators on Euclidean 
spaces and applications to linear differential equations. 

Math 301 Advanced Calculus (3) 

Elementary point-set topology and functions of several vari- 
ables, treated in detail. 

Math 302 Vector Valued Functions (3) 

A study of vector valued functions of several variables. 

Math 303 Algebra I (3) 

Elementary theory of Groups, Rings, and Fields. 

Math 304 Algebra II (3) 

The content of this course may vary from year to year and 
will depend on the interests of the students and of the in- 
structor. The following options, among others, will be avail- 
able: 

Selected topics in the Theory of Finite Groups 
Introduction to the Theory of Rings and Homology 
Introduction to the Theory of Fields and Galois Theory 

Math 305 Mathematical Probability (3) 

A study of Probability which assumes some knowledge of 
Calculus. 

Math 306 Mathematical Statistics (3) 

A study of Statistics which assumes some knowledge of Cal- 
culus and Probability. 

Math 307 Numerical Analysis I (3) 

A study of linear and non-linear equations, interpolation and 
more general methods of approximation. 

Math 308 Numerical Analysis II (3) 

A study of the methods of Numerical Analysis which lend 
themselves to analysis and solution of problems by computers. 

Math 309 Computer Science (3) 

Introduction to the principles of Computer Science. Automated 
procedures, logic and language aspects will be discussed. 
Some programming languages will be studied and used. Rec- 
ommended to students who have had one year of Mathema- 
tics. 



28 



Math 401 Real Analysis (3) 

Lebesque measure, Lebesque integral and its relation to the 
Riemann integral. 

Math 402 Introduction to Topology (3) 

Topological spaces and their properties. 

Math 403-404 Functions of the Complex Variable (3, 3) 

A study of Cauchy-Riemann equations, contour integration, 
Laurent series, calculus of residues, conformal mapping, 
Dirichlet problem. 

Math 497-498 Independent Study in Mathematics (0-3, 

0-3) 
Independent programs of reading and research in an area of 
the student's choice. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. The 
following options, among others, will be available: 

Introduction to Number Theory 

Elementary Geometry from an Advance Standpoint 

The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. The student must carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Indepen- 
dent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

Math 499 Senior Project (0-3) 

PHYSICS 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS: 
Phy 301, Phy 302, Phy 303, Phy 304, Chem 201, Chem 202, 
Chem 203, Chem 204, Math 101-102 or Math 111-112 and 
Math 201-202. 

Phy 101-102 Basic Concepts in Physics and Chemistry 

(4,4) 
Selected topics in classical and quantum physics. The se- 
lected topics in classical physics include force, energy, mo- 
tion, wave motion, heat, electricity, magnetism, and light. The 
selected topics in quantum physics include quanta, the atom, 
and the nucleus. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period per week. This course may be counted towards filling 
the science requirement. 

Two of the following four courses will be given the second 
semester; which courses will depend on the interest of the 
students. In general the laboratory will be given at Boston 
College through cross registration. 



Phy 301 Introduction to Atomic and Nuclear Physics (4) 

Atomic and nuclear structure, nuclear transformations, fission, 
fusion, elementary particles. Three lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 100 or Phy 111, 112 or the equivalent. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

Phy 302 Optics (4) 

Geometrical and physical optics theory and use of optical 
instruments. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 100 or Phy 111, 112 or the equivaelnt. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

Phy 303 Mechanics (4) 

Newtonian mechanics, rotational motion, wave motion. Three 
lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 100 or Phy 111, 112 or the equivalent. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

Phy 304 Electricity (4) 

Fundamental laws of electric and magnetic fields: electric 
circuits; principles of electronics: electrical measuring in- 
struments. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 100 or 111, 112 or the equivalent. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

The infusion into the public schools of novel and improved 
educational materials and patterns of learning generated by 
the curriculum reform programs of the past decade has de- 
pended in large measure on the retraining of teachers in 
service. It has become increasingly clear that to insure large- 
scale effective use of these new patterns and to minimize 
degradation in the manner of their employment, it is neces- 
sary to launch programs of corresponding new patterns of 
learning in the colleges which prepare future teachers. The 
need for such renovation of pre-service teacher education has 
now become a major endeavor at Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart. 

The major objective at Newton College will be to develop 
a science base of elementary and secondary education courses 
that will reflect the philosophy and style of learning that char- 
acterizes the products of the science course improvement 
programs. 



29 



SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
Science Education at Newton College will consist of the fol- 
lowing three major areas: 

1. Training — Preservice, in-service and summer training pro- 
grams will be developed. The basic courses will deal with 
current methodology. 

2. Resource and In-Service Training Center — A collection of 
educational materials will be available from most of the 
major curriculum development groups. Instruction and prac- 
tice opportunity in the use of all materials will be provided. 

3. Developmental Center — For the on-going development of 
graded self-contained units in science. New educational 
packages will be tested in local schools. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION COURSES 

Sci Ed 401 Methods of Teaching the Biological, Chemi- 
cal and Physical Sciences (4) 

Sci Ed 402 Methods of Teaching the Biological, Chemi- 
cal, and Physical Sciences (4) 

Sci Ed 406 Practice Teaching in the Sciences (4) 

SCIENCE NON-MAJOR COURSES 

Science 101-102 Scientific Basis of Social Issues (4,4) 
Development of a core of basic biological concepts and a 
study of their application to current social problems. Lecture, 
discussion, laboratory, and field work in local communities. 
Course taught on a pass/fail basis. 

Science 103-104 Scientific Concepts for the Responsible 
Citizen (2, 2) 

A course for students desirous of studying how the ideas of 
science affect their daily lives and relate to the future of man. 
Particular emphasis will be placed on a study of reproductive 
development, heredity, and ecology. Two one-hour lectures, 
demonstrations, and discussion a week. Course taught on a 
pass/fail basis. Regular attendance required because of the 
nature of the course. 

Science 105 Science and Public Policy (2) 

The role of scientist as advisors to the government. The role 
of the government in support of science. Two lectures, discus- 
sion. Open to anyone interested. 

Science 106 Science and the Law (2) 

The protection of scientific discoveries, their patenting, how 
patents are issued, their exploitation. The role of science in 
law enforcement. Open to anyone interested. 



Division of 
Social Science & Religion 



ECONOMICS 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
A major in economics is required to present eight (8) upper 
division courses, i.e., of the 300 level and above, in addition 
to the introductory courses Ec 101-102 and Ec 207. A senior 
project is usually presented in the senior year. The eight (8) 
upper division courses must include the following: Ec 301- 
302, Ec 305, Ec 401 or 402, and Ec 405. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
A minor in economics must present Ec 101-102 and Ec 301 
or 302 plus any three (3) department electives for a minimum 
of fifteen (15) hours. 

Ec 101-102 Principles of Economics (3,3) 
Introduction to the basic concepts of economics and the 
fundamental institutions of economic society. 

Ec 207 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

A course designed to provide knowledge of the mathematical 
techniques used in modern economics. The topics will include 
integration and differentiation with applications in the theories 
of the firm and consumer behavior, macro-economic models. 



30 



Ec 301 Micro-Economic Analysis (3) 

Micro-Economics; price theory and distribution analysis. 
Prerequisite: Ec 101-102. 

Ec 302 Macro-Economic Analysis (3) 

Classical Keynesian and Post-Keynesian aggregative analysis. 
Prerequisite: Ec 101-102. 

Ec 306 Statistics (3) 

Statistical methods as used in economics. Collection and pre- 
sentation of date index numbers, time series analysis, mea- 
surements of central tendency and dispersion. The normal 
curve and statistical inference. Measurements of simple linear 
correlation. 

Ec 354 Accounting Principles (3) 

Organization and analysis of financial transactions, construc- 
tion and interpretation of financial statements. 

Ec 366 Money and Banking (3) 

A study of the history of banking. Analysis of deposit creation 
and central banking with application to objectives and effec- 
tiveness of modern monetary policy. 

Ec 370 Labor Economics and Problems (3) 

Theory of wages and employment. The study of institutional 
factors affecting wage determination, income distribution and 
the efficient use of labor resources; the development of trade 
unionism and collective bargaining. 

Ec 385-386 Economic Development (3, 3) 

Theoretical examination of structural changes associated with 
the process of economic development: special reference to 
poor countries and analysis of criteria for policy judgments in 
development planning. 

Ec 391 International Economics (3) 

Fundamentals of international trade, international monetary 
system and selected topics involving international liquidity 
and adjustment mechanisms. 

Ec 401 Advanced Macro-Theory Seminar (3) 

Reading and analysis of modern developments in aggregative 
economic analysis. 

Ec 402 Advanced Micro-Theory Seminar (3) 

Reading and analysis of selected topics in contemporary de- 
velopments in the theory of the firm. 



Ec 405 History of Economic Thought (3) 

Traces development of economic theory from the classical to 
the modern period. Attention is given to historical economics, 
institutional economics, national income economics and the 
American economic school. 

Ec 461-462 Urban Economics: Principles and Problems 

(3,3) 
Examination of the urban complex, its origins, problems and 
future. Emphasis on such topics as housing, discrimination, 
transportation and decline of the central city. 

Ec 482 Business and Government (3) 

The development of the government's role in economic life. 
The relationship of government to business; anti-trust legisla- 
tion and its effect on market structure and performance. 

Ec 497-498 Independent Study in Economics (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the pro- 
fessor giving the course and as approved by a representative 
of the Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Indepen- 
dent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

Ec 499 Senior Project (0-3) 
Required of all Economics majors. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

Majors must receive a grade of C or higher in both semesters 
of the pre-major course PS 221-222 Patterns of Political 
Thought, as well as in at least 10 semesters of upper division 
courses in political science which must be distributed to in- 
clude at least 2 semesters in each of the following areas: 
American (A); International and Comparative Politics (B); Po- 
litical Thought and Theory (C). The required semesters in 
each area must be selected from the courses labeled either 
(A), (B) or (C). 

Majors should also submit an acceptable senior project. 
Close consultation with the chairman of the department is 
strongly urged for any student intending to pursue graduate 
study. 



31 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
The minimal requirements for a minor in political science con- 
sist of 6 semesters of upper division courses in political sci- 
ence equally distributed among the 3 above-mentioned areas. 

PS 101 The Political Man (3) 

An inquiry into the political dimensions, structures and viable 
alternatives in the contemporary world. 

PS 102 Introduction to Political Analysis (3) 

A study of the science and art of political analysis as applied 
to the investigation of selected contemporary issues. The 
problems of testing of propositions against the data of experi- 
ence by observation, classification and measurement. 

PS 103-104 Dissent: The Growth of Consciousness in 

Antiquity (3, 3) 
The theme of dissent will serve as a framework within which 
major figures of Greek and Roman civilization, both literary 
and historical, will be studied. Readings, discussions and oc- 
casional lectures. No prerequisites. 

(Same as CI 103-104) 

PS 221-222 Patterns of Political Thought (3, 3) 

An exploration of the genesis of significant political ideas and 
thought-patterns operative now and incorporated in the socio- 
political, intellectual and ideological structures and processes. 

PS 301-302 American Government (3, 3) (A) 

First semester devoted to the Federal system with attention 
directed to the Constitution, civil rights, the presidency, Con- 
gress and the federal judiciary. Second semester concerns 
the state and local areas with attention directed to the state 
constitutions, governorship, legislature; rural local govern- 
ment, the county and its traditional offices, state courts and 
municipal governments; the rising challenge of the metropoli- 
tan problems. 

PS 303 American Political Parties (3) 

Nature and purpose of political parties; the history of major 
and minor political parties; party leadership and techniques; 
the suffrage. A reading-discussion course. 

PS 304 State and Local Government in the United States 

(3) 
State constitutions, fiscal practice, taxation, budgeting, gov- 
ernorship, electoral laws, legislature, judiciaries, city, county 
and town administrations; the problems of metropolitan areas. 



PS 305 Public Administration (3) 

Basic concepts and organization principles of bureaucracy; 
the place of administration and the role of administrators in 
the American system of government; patronage and merit; 
career service and political executives; pressure groups. The 
process of social, economic and financial decision-making. 

PS 307 American Political Thought (3) (A) 

Selected problems in American Political Thought to be ex- 
plored intensively. 

PS 308 Race Relations in America (3) 

Analysis of the political, social, cultural and economic factors 
underlying contemporary race relations and an examination 
of the attempts to resolve racial problems. 

PS 311-312 Urban Practicum (3, 3) 

Involvement in an urban office or agency, governmental or 
private, to study in the broadest sense some aspect of an 
urban problem under the direction of the Archdiocesan Plan- 
ning Office. One semester only. Enrollment in the course, type 
of work, hours and place, to be arranged with the instructor. 

PS 313-314 Development of American Institutions (3, 3) 

(A) 
In the first semester, the course will focus on the public sec- 
tor, including the Presidency, the courts, administrative agen- 
cies and political parties. The second term will be devoted to 
the private sector: the universities, the communications media, 
business and finance, labor unions and the Church. While 
considering procedure, the course will deal primarily with the 
allocation of policy-making powers, the choice of institutions 
for reform, and the problems of implementation regarding 
acute current issues. 

PS 315 Law and Social Control (3) 

Through case studies, the course will examine the methods 
by which the American legal system shapes the nation's social 
fabric. 

PS 317 Government in Urban Areas (3) 

The responsibilities, authorities and activities of local govern- 
ment units will be considered within the context of problems 
raised by structure, powers and territorial definition. Particu- 
lar attention will be devoted to the distribution of power be- 
tween state and local authorities, metropolitan financing, real 
estate development, decentralization of city government and 
the role of federal grants. Contemporary problems will pro- 
vide the materials and emphasis will be placed on the function 



32 



of lawsuits as a means of directing governmental powers. 

PS 318 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (3) 

An historical and analytical review of the development of 
human rights in the American legal system. Selected topics 
will be considered: (1) freedom of religion, (2) censorship and 
privacy, (3) freedom of speech, (4) national security and loy- 
alty, (5) the right to vote, (6) racial discrimination. Cases re- 
viewed will range from traditional constitutional dogma to the 
legal frontiers suggested by litigation involving Martin Luther 
King, Pete Seeger, Timothy Leary, and Benjamin Spock. 

PS 322 Development of American Law (3) 

Legal principles and institutions will be considered in histori- 
cal perspective, from English origins to current reform move- 
ments. Particular attention will be devoted to changing con- 
cepts of law, the Anglo-American common law tradition, the 
relation of economics, politics and law, and the emergence of 
unique rights in the United States. 

PS 323 Seminar in the United Nations (3) 

A study of current issues before the main organs of the United 
Nations involving the preparation of draft resolutions for pre- 
sentation to the National Model United Nations. Students will 
serve as delegates from a selected country to the NMUN. 

The course is given throughout two semesters but credit is 
given only at the end of the second semester. 

PS 325-326 Comparative Politics (3, 3) (B) 

A comparative analysis of political patterns and systems se- 
lected from the West European, Soviet and Asian areas: 
France, Great Britain, West Germany and the USSR; Japan, 
India and China. Major issues in the politics of the countries 
considered. 

PS 327-328 Politics of World Order (3, 3) (B) 

This course focuses on the problem of attaining world peace. 
The existing processes of peace are evaluated as well as the 
possibilities of developing a workable system of world order. 
Continuing conflicts in contemporary international relations 
are considered. 

PS 329 International Relations in No-man's Lands (3) 

(B) 
An analysis of legal and political issues arising in the sea, 
air, and space environments. Special attention is given to 
recent and forthcoming developments in the legal regimes of 
these environments, as well as to conflicts of interests among 
states and to efforts to achieve international cooperation. 



PS 332 Political Development of the European Commu- 
nity (3) (B) 
This course provides a study of the political framework of the 
Western European Community and deals with the political 
aspects of the Common Market's relations with the world. 
The process of Western European Integration is analyzed. 

PS 333 Law and International Politics (3) (B) 

An examination of the nature of international law and its uses 
in international politics, notably in recent political crises and 
controversies. 

PS 334 Political Sociology (3) (C) 

An inquiry into selected areas of political sociology; repre- 
sentative theorists; the physical and social frameworks of 
politics; sources of political antagonisms; political strategies; 
the processes of political integration; public opinion and 
propaganda. 

PS 341 Dissent and Revolution (3) (C) 

An inquiry into the foundations, structures and projected con- 
sequences of political activism. 

PS 342 Political Anthropology (3) (C) 

A critical comparative analysis of the Lockean, Hegelian, and 
Marxian notions of man, their bearings on political reality and 
political programs, their confrontation with Christian commit- 
ment. 

PS 343 Political Imagination (3) (C) 

An inquiry into the nature and role of imagination in the 
formulation of political aspiration and in the dynamics of com- 
munication as expressed, primarily, in the works of literature. 

PS 344 Politics of Hope (3) (C) 

A problematic and critical exploration of the Christian condi- 
tion in the contemporary world with introductions to Gandhi, 
Mao Tse-tung, Nyeure, H. Marcuse, Ernst Bloch and Emman- 
uel Mounier. 

Offered in collaboration with the Psychology and Religion 
Departments, PG 486 and Rel 352. 

PS 345 Russian Revolutionary Tradition (3) 

History of Russian revolutionary movement from the Decem- 
brist revolt in the first quarter of the 19th century to Trotsky- 
Stalin controversy in the 1920's. Survey of ideologies of 
Nihilism, Populism, Terrorism, Menshevism and Bolshevism. 
Intensive study of the socio-political and ideological roots of 
Leninism and Stalinism. 



33 



PS 346 Political Thought from Lenin to Brezhnev (3) 

Intensive examination of the political ideas of the leaders of 
the Soviet Union from its origins in 1917 to the present. Study 
of the interaction between the Communist program of action 
and the Soviet domestic and foreign policies. 

PS 351 Seminar: Religious Institutions and the Politics of 
Social Change (3) 

Directed field experience in which seminar participants will 
investigate how specific churches and synagogues respond 
to social issues. Participants will be asked to analyze the 
socio-political and religious profile of a particular church or 
synagogue and to assess the dynamics of response within 
that institution. Emphasis on the formulation of major ques- 
tions and on the development of observation techniques by 
seminar participants themselves. Bi-weekly seminar meetings. 
(Same as Rel 381). 

PS 404 Seminar on Practical Politics: Nuts and Bolts (3) 

An intensive analysis of the numerous and often detailed prob- 
lems of practical politics by examining the "why" and "how" 
of political action. Emphasis is placed on how one may be- 
come or support a successful candidate for elective office on 
the national, state or local level. Examined will be such sub- 
jects as getting started, campaign organization, finances, vol- 
unteers, research, publicity, media, polling, canvassing, elec- 
tion day procedures, etc. A research paper is required and 
personal involvement in a political campaign is encouraged. 

PS 451 Political Theory Seminar (3) 

A study in depth of major trends in contemporary Political 
Science, their empirical and theoretical foundations and 
methods. 

PS 497-498 Independent Study in Political Science (0-3, 

0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Indepen- 
dent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

His 379 American Constitutional Development (3) 

See History section for description. 



Soc 351-352 Comparative Systems (3) 

See Sociology section for description. 

PS 499 Senior Project (0-3) 
Required of all Political Science majors. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Types of courses: The Psychology Department has three main 
areas of concentration: personality and social psychology, de- 
velopmental psychology, humanistic psychology. At the same 
time training is given in the various research methods. Stu- 
dents may choose to concentrate in consultation with the 
chairman. Courses are numbered to indicate level of content 
and area of concentration. 

PG 100: Introductory courses and prerequisites 

PG 200: Those in tne 220's are also prerequisites; above 
220 are more general courses open to sophomore majors and 
minors. 

PG 300: These are open to juniors and are advanced 
courses. 

PG 400: These are open only to advanced juniors or with 
the approval of the instructor. 

The areas of concentration are numbered in this way: 

40 Developmental 

50 Personality 

60 Methodology and Learning Theory 

70 Social and Cultural 

80 Humanistic 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Prerequisites: (1) PG 171 or 172 

(2) Math 113-114 (Mathematics for Behavioral 
Sciences). One semester is sufficient. Two semesters are rec- 
ommended. 

(3) PG 225 

Required Courses: PG 228, PG 255, PG 333-334 and at 
least four other courses above PG 230. 
A senior project, PG 499, is always required. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 

Prerequisite PG 203 or PG 225 and four other courses 
above PG 230 in the area of concentration chosen by the 
students under the direction of one or more members of the 
department. Two courses at least should be over PG 300. 

PG 171-172 Human Anatomy (3) 

A study of all the systems of man including both gross and 
microscopic anatomy. PG 172 is equivalent to PG 171 but is 
given in the second semester. 



34 



PG 203 General Psychology (3) 

A beginning course in psychology for non-psychology majors. 
Emphasis will be placed on the chief problems of psychology 
and their practical applications. 

PG 225-226 Introduction to Psychology (3, 3) 

A study of the chief problems of psychology and an introduc- 
tion to methods of research. For majors only. PG 226 is the 
same as PG 225 but is offered second semester. 

PG 228 Statistics (3) 

An introduction to statistical terms and concepts; measures 
of central tendency, variability, and relationship; theory of 
sampling; reliability of statistical measures; regression and 
prediction. 
No late registrants will be accepted in this course. 

PG 245-246 Child Development (3, 3) 

Introduction to human development from conception through 
late childhood. Physical, intellectual, social, and personality 
development will be studied with attention to relevant genetic 
and environmental factors. 

PG 246 same as PG 245 taught in second semester. 

PG 247 Cognitive Growth (3) 

Intensive examination of selected topics in cognitive growth, 
focusing on the contributions of Piaget and social-learning 
theorists. 

Prerequisite: PG 245 or 246. 

PG 248 Developmental Psychology (3) 

Study of the emotional, moral, intellectual and social prob- 
lems of each age from childhood through old age in the light 
of various theories of human development, especially those 
of Erikson, Piaget, Allport. 

Not open to freshmen or sophomores non-majors or minors. 

PG 255 Theories of Personality (3) 

A consideration of the major personality theories. Attention 
is given to their utility in understanding normal personality. 

PG 256 Psychological Assessment (3) 

An inquiry into the nature and problems of psychological 
assessment. Several major objective and projective tests will 
be examined and evaluated with respect to reliability, validity, 
standardization and practical applications. 
Prerequisites: PG 228 and PG 255. 

PG 268 Physiological Psychology (3) 

A survey of the effect of the systems of the body on the per- 



sonality with major emphasis on the nervous system. This 
course presupposes a knowledge of human anatomy. 

PG 333-334 Experimental Psychology (3, 3) 

Basic concepts and development of experimental psychology. 
Introduction to experimental methods and writing research 
reports. Laboratory experiments in sensorimotor reactions, 
reaction time, association and learning processes, work and 
fatigue curve, emotional reactions, and social behavior. 

PG 341 Psychology of Religion and Moral Development 

(3) 
A study of the interrelationship of moral and religious values 
as these affect the development of personality. An attempt 
will be made to distinguish and assess the contributions (1) 
of religious ethics and (2) of moral and developmental psy- 
chology to the study of morality. 

PG 344 Human Ecology (3) 

An inquiry into some current bio-social problems facing man- 
kind, including the intellectual, social, and political factors 
involved in such problems as overpopulation, environmental 
pollution, conservation, urbanization and food supply. 

PG 351 Abnormal Psychology (3) 

An introduction of psychopathology. In addition to formal 
diagnostic categories, illustrated with case histories, this 
course explores theories and empirical data relevant to the 
understanding and treatment of maladaptive behavior. 
Prerequisite: PG 255 

PG 365 History of Psychology (3) 

A study of the development of psychology from its origins in 
philosophy, the biological sciences and sociology to its pres- 
ent forms. Emphasis on main problems, solved and yet un- 
solved, which have characterized the discipline. This will be 
done by directed study. It is a reading course. 

PG 366 Theories of Learning (3) 

A study of theoretical and empirical bases for understanding 
the learning process, and an exploration of the development 
and forms of cognitive process. Attention is given to language 
acquisition, curiosity, creativity and related phenomena. 

PG 371 Social Psychology (3) 

The study of normal human behavior in terms of interaction 
with other individuals, in small groups and in larger organiza- 
tions. Consideration of major theories and research findings 
in the field of social psychology. 



35 



PG 372 Culture and Personality (3) 

The relationship between personality and the cultural context 
in which the personality patterns develop. Consideration of 
major theories of personality in the light of cultural differ- 
ences. Major emphasis will be placed on minority groups and 
subcultures within American culture. Prerequisite PG 255 or 
approval of instructor. 

PG 374 Group Dynamics (3) 

Overview of the theory and research on major aspects of 
small group functioning, e.g. leadership, communication, per- 
formance. The emphasis in the course will be on reports from 
the psychological literature, but students may participate in 
one or more group experiences as additional sources of 
understanding group process. 

Prerequisite: PG 371 or approval of instructor. 

PG 376 Industrial Psychology (3) 

Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and social founda- 
tions of industrial psychology. Topic areas considered will 
include: decision making; organizational behavior; human 
relations and management problems; principles of human 
performance. 

PG 381 Humanistic Psychology (3) 

Readings and discussion of the chief works of Freud, Jung, 
Fromm and the humanistic psychologists such as Maslow, 
May, Rogers and Laing. These readings emphasize the 
theories of religion, creativity, symbolism and society. 

PG 446 Emotional Problems of Childhood (3) 

Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and prevention of disorders 
in childhood, ranging from mild behavior problems to psy- 
chosis. Emphasis on biological and psychological theories and 
research. 

Prerequisites: PG 245 or 246, PG 352. 

PG 453-454 Clinical Procedures (6) 

A year-long course offering one or two afternoons of field 
work with adults or children. The lectures and discussions will 
emphasize the role of the psychologist and other mental health 
workers, the place of mental health services in a community 
structure, the relationship between client and helper and 
evaluation of effectiveness of service. Students must enroll for 
both semesters. No credit will be given for one semester. 



PG 465 Comparative Psychology (3) 

An introductory laboratory course in the psychology of animal 
behavior. Major topic areas will include: Why study animal 
behavior?; methodological considerations in animal research; 
sensory processes; instinct theory; experience and develop- 
ment of behavior. 

PG 471-472 Field Research in Social and Community 
Psychology (3, 3) 

Advanced students will be accepted for independent study 
projects in any one of the major areas of social psychology, 
such as attitude change, cognitive theory, motivation, survey 
research, etc. 

A limited number of advanced students will be accepted for 
independent study projects in areas of community psychology, 
such as role of the psychologist, new concepts in the delivery 
of mental health services, evaluation of community mental 
health. Students are urged to participate in these projects as 
teams of two. 

One or two semesters upon consultation with the instructor. 

PG 482 Theories of Self in Philosophy and Psychology 

(3) 
An inquiry into the development of the idea of the self as seen 
by philosophers and psychologists from Descartes to the 
present day. 

Prerequisite: 255 or permission of the professor. 

PG 485 Psychology of Women (3) 

Students do independent research on psychological aspects 
of women in relation to contemporary society. Limited to 15 
students. Permission of the instructor. 

PG 486 Psychology of Hope (3) 

Readings in the works of those psychologists who stress the 
creative potential of each man and of mankind rather than 
the abnormalities. Done in collaboration with PS 344 and Rel 
352. 

PG 497-498 Independent Study in Psychology (0-3, 0-3) 
Selected upperclassmen will be allowed to do research on 
projects under qualified psychologists in the Boston area. The 
student who wishes to take one or two semesters of Inde- 
pendent Study will present a typewritten detailed description 
of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 



36 



The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Inde- 
pendent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

PG 499 Senior Project (3) 

Presentation of research done on one problem in psychology 
to the Department for evaluation. Project may be completed 
in either the fall or spring semester. 

Religion 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
With the advice of a professor in the department, each student 
should plan a program of at least ten courses (to be com- 
pleted with a minimum grade of C), including Rel 141-142, at 
least four Special Courses, and at least four Advanced — one 
of the last to be the Senior Seminar. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
With the advice of a professor in the department, each student 
should plan a program of at least five courses (to be com- 
pleted with a minimum grade of C), at least two of which 
should be Special Courses and at least one, Advanced. 

STRUCTURE OF CURRICULUM 
The curriculum is structured vertically according to degrees 
of methodical rigor into Introductory, Special, and Advanced 
courses and horizontally according to distinctions of method 
into eight functional specialties. 

100 Introductory Courses: Intended to impart an apprecia- 
tion for the religious dimension of human existence and 
an initiation to the scientific study of religion. 

200 Special Courses: Designed to provide a systematic 
grounding in the application of specific methods of 
inquiry to various fields of religious study. 

300 Advanced Courses: Meant to inculcate an expertise in 
the use of specific methods for the study of religion. 

The functional specialties are: 

10 Research: The gathering of the data of religious experi- 
ence and religious institutions. 

20 Interpretation: The analysis of religious data in their 
proper historical and cultural context. 

30 History: The study of the development of religious move- 
ments within the context of world history. 



40 Dialectics: The critical evaluation of religious history in 
order to arrive at a comprehensive viewpoint. 

50 Foundations: The determination of the import of a Chris- 
tian horizon for human existence. 

60 Doctrines: The examination of the dogmatic, moral, 
ascetical, mystical, and pastoral teachings of the Church. 

70 Systematics: The clear and consistent conceptualization 
of Christian doctrines according to a particular philo- 
sophical outlook or way of thinking. 

80 Communications: The consideration of the methods and 
the media for religious education and religious practice. 

Rel 111 Tutorial in Biblical Hebrew (3) 

Introduction to basic vocabulary and grammar of Biblical 
Hebrew. Emphasis on learning to read simple sentences in 
the Hebrew Old Testament and on acquiring a facility in using 
the critical notes in the Hebrew text. 

Rel 112 Tutorial in Elementary Sanskrit (3) 

Introduction to basic vocabulary and grammar; guidance in 
reading sacred scriptures of India, such as the Rigveda and 
the Upanishads. 

Rel 121 Introduction to the Bible (3) 

A survey of the biblical literature (Old and New Testaments) 
including an introduction to various modern presuppositions 
and methodologies of biblical study. Emphasis on the his- 
torical and theological development of the Israelites, the 
Jews, and the early Christians as they struggled with the 
problems of God, man and the world. 

Rel 131 Religion in America (3) 

A study of the historical and cultural context of religious 
developments in America, with research into and interpreta- 
tion of primary sources, in order to achieve an understanding 
of major themes, movements, and institutions. 

Rel 141 Introduction to the Study of Religion: Part I (3) 

A consideration of the religious dimension in human con- 
sciousness; an analysis of the origins and significance of 
primitive religions; a study of the religions of the Far East. 

Rel 142 Introduction to the Study of Religion: Part II (3) 

An analysis of the origins of religion in the Near East; a study 
of the development of Judaism, Christianity and Islam; a 
consideration of the significance of secularization; and a 
description of religious methodology. 



37 



Rel 153 Love and Violence (3) 

A study of the practicality of Christian love, beginning with a 
consideration of the violence in contemporary protest move- 
ments, going on to an analysis of nonviolent resistance par- 
ticularly as exemplified in Martin Luther King and Mahatma 
Gandhi, and concluding with an examination of the implica- 
tions of Jesus Christ's command of brotherly love. 

Rel 211 Biblical Archaeology and Biblical History (3) 

History and methodology of Near Eastern excavations in- 
cluding a concentrated study of several archaeological sites. 
Analysis of the contributions of archaeological research to a 
more accurate understanding of the history and everyday life 
of the biblical period (Old and New Testament times) within 
the broader context of the history of the ancient Near Eastern 
and Mediterranean worlds. 

Rel 221 Old Testament Prophets and Modern Social 
Problems (3) 

The prophets as a major influence in the historical and 
theological development of the people of Israel. The phe- 
nomenon of prophetism and its development will be studied in 
detail. Particular emphasis on the relevance of the prophetic 
ideal to the modern world including an attempt to define 
modern prophets. 

Rel 222 Pauline Theology (3) 

An in-depth study of the letters of Paul with particular em- 
phasis on Paul's contribution as a theologian to the on-going 
life of the early church. Consideration of major theological 
»hemes (e.g., Christ, the Church, Spirit, Christian Love) and 
of the historical and religious conditions which provided the 
context for the various responses of Paul. 

Rel 223 Biblical Theology (3) 

An examination of current attempts to formulate a biblical 
theology (based on both testaments) including an analysis of 
some of the problems involved in such a task. Detailed study 
of major biblical theological motifs with an opportunity for 
individual study of particular themes which are of interest to 
the student. 

Rel 224 Sacred Scriptures of India (3) 

Interpretation of verbal expressions of ultimate concern from 
Indian scriptures, including the Rigveda, Samaveda, Yajur- 
veda, Upanishadsm, Agamas, and Puranas; Jaina, Sikh and 
Parsi scriptures will also be included. 



Rel 225 Buddhist Sacred Texts (3) 

Study of Theravada, Mohayana and Vajracchedika scriptures; 
interpretation of these texts according to selected doctrinal 
schools. 

Rel 226 Indian Mythology and Iconography (3) 

Interpretation of religious functions of myths and icons as 
representations of the sacred within various Indian belief 
systems. 

Rel 231 Religion in India (3) 

An historical study of various patterns of ultimate concern in 
India as they appear in the theological and philosophical sys- 
tems, sacred texts, and religious ritual and organizations of 
Indian culture. 

Rel 232 Followers of the Buddha in India (3) 

An historical study of the development of the Buddha and 
of subsequent Buddhist communities of faith and practice. 

Rel 233 Religion in China (3) 

An historical study of the variety of ultimate concerns in 
China as they appear in theological and philosophical sys- 
tems, sacred texts, and religious ritual and organizations of 
Chinese culture. 

Rel 234 Religion in Japan (3) 

An historical study of the variety of ultimate concerns in 
Japan as they appear in belief systems, sacred texts, and 
religious ritual and organizations of Japanese culture. 

Rel 235 Religion in Africa (3) 

An historical study of the variety of ultimate concerns in 
Africa as they appear in belief systems, sacred texts, and 
religious ritual and organizations of African culture. 

Rel 236 Sectarian Judaism and Primitive Christianity (3) 

Consideration of the religious and historical milieu in which 
the early Christian Church arose. Survey of the various sect 
groups within Judaism prior to the rise of Christianity (e.g., 
Essenes, Hellenistic Jews, Pharisees, Sadducees) followed by 
an in-depth study of the experience and problems of the 
early church as it moved out of the context of Judaism into 
the Gentile world. 

Rel 237 The Development of Christian Doctrine (3) 

An historical study of the engagement of Christianity with the 
Hellenistic culture of the Roman Empire, with equal attention 
to the formulation of the doctrines of the divinity of Christ and 



38 



the Blessed Trinity and to the organization of Christianity as 
the Church. 

Rel 238 Black Religion in America (3) 

A documentary study of the variety of religious experience 
and expression among black men in America; interpretation 
within American historical, cultural and religious context; 
dialectics of forces studied. 

Rel 239 Modern Judaism (3) 

An examination of the historical and theological process by 
which modern Judaism emerged including a study of Jewish 
festivals and present-day theological trends in Judaism. Some 
attention will be given to the theological bases for Jewish- 
Christian dialogue. Field experience in Greater Boston area 
encouraged. 

Rel 241 The Ecumenical Significance of the Reformation 

(3) 
An evaluation of the Reformation in its origins, course and 
consequences; with particular attention to the thought of 
Luther, Munzer, Calvin, and Wesley; and a consideration of 
the Counter-Reformation era in Catholicism. 

Rel 251 The Death of God in the Modern World (3) 

A study of the meaning of secularization, with particular atten- 
tion to philosophical objections to the existence of God, and 
a consideration of Christian atheism. 

Rel 261 Jesus of History/Christ of Faith (3) 

An examination of belief in Christ, especially regarding his 
human consciousness, in light of the modern quest for the 
historical Jesus. 

Rel 262 Suffering and Dying (3) 

A reflection upon the meaning for the Christian of acts of 
suffering and dying as both necessity and opportunity. 

Rel 311 Religious Documentary Production (3) 

Advanced, interdisciplinary seminar to learn research meth- 
ods through experience by producing interpretations of reli- 
gious communities on film. 

Prerequisites: Basic Film Making, (AS 272) and Religion in 
America (Rel 131). 

Rel 321 Mythology in the Bible and in the Literatures of 
the Ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean Worlds (3) 

Examination of various ancient mythic types: e.g., the crea- 
tion, the flood, the fall, dying and rising deity, with an attempt 



to discern the function of myth in the religious life of a 
people. Analysis of the unique contributions of the Israelites 
and the early Christians to mythic literature. 

Rel 322 Interpretation of the Synoptic Gospels (3) 

Emphasis on the nature of the synoptic gospels as sources 
with the focal point of interpretation being the problem of the 
historical Jesus. 

Rel 323 Zen and Other Buddhist Systems (3) 

An examination of the primary sources of Zen and of other 
selected Buddhist systems to determine their basic beliefs 
and practices. 

Rel 331 Far Eastern Religious Movements in America (3) 

A study of the pluralistic nature of religion in modern America 
and of the impact of Far Eastern religions. 

Rel 341 The Meaning of Human Existence (3) 

An analysis of the dynamics of human consciousness, with 
particular attention to the emergence of the religious di- 
mension, and a consideration of the conditions for the 
possibility of faith. 

Rel 351 A Philosophy of Religion (3) 

A determination of the significance of a religious perspective 
on life, with attention to the questions of revelation, prophecy, 
inspiration, and tradition, and a consideration of the meaning 
of prayer and mysticism. 

Rel 352 A Theology of Hope (3) 

A reflection upon the Christian origins and consequences of 
Ernst Bloch's politics of hope (in coordination with PS 344, 
and PG 486). 

Rel 353 Biblical Perspectives on Modern Life (3) 

Emphasis on dialogue between biblical and modern views of 
life. Consideration of various hermeneutical methods by which 
modern man seeks to understand the Bible followed by an 
assessment of the challenge of the biblical message to 
modern man. Such issues as life-style, the nature of person- 
hood, the nature of love, etc. will be considered. Primary 
source material includes the parables of Jesus and selected 
Old Testament readings. 

Rel 371 Philosophical Theology (3) 

An examination of 'God-talk', with an evaluation of various 
approaches to systematic theology, including phenomenology, 
existentialism, process-thought, and linguistic analysis. 



39 



Rel 381 Religious Institutions and the Politics of Social 
Change (3) 

Directed field experience in which seminar participants will 
investigate how specific churches and synagogues respond to 
social issues. Participants will be asked to analyze the socio- 
political and religious profile of a particular church or syna- 
gogue and to assess the dynamics of response within that 
institution. Emphasis on the formulation of major questions 
and on the development of observation techniques by seminar 
participants themselves in conjunction with PS 351. 

Rel 401 Senior Honors Seminar (3) 

Rel 497-498 Independent Study in Religion (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor giving the course and as approved by a repre- 
sentative of the Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Inde- 
pendent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

Rel 499 Senior Project (3) 

Required of all Religion majors. 

Sociology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Soc 101-102 (pre-major course), Soc 301-302, Soc 303, Soc 
401-402 in Senior year. Eight upper division courses with 
grade of C or better; six courses must be taken from courses 
offered in the Sociology department and two courses may be 
chosen from courses offered in other departments listed 
below. Satisfactory completion of a Senior Project. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS 
The Sociology department also offers a minor in sociology for 
students who complete Soc 101-102 and three upper division 
courses with a grade of C or better. 

Soc 101 Sociology I (3) 

Sociological concepts. Society and Culture. Social groups. 
Stratifications. Age and Sex groups. Collective behavior. 



Soc 102 Sociology II (3) 

The population problem. Communities and urbanization. In- 
heritance and race. Mass communication media and censor- 
ship. Bureaucracy. The Family. War and revolution. 

Soc 301 Sociological Theory I (3) 

Central theoretical ideas and concepts used by major thinkers 
will be examined including the notion of community, au- 
thority, status, the sacred, alienation. The formulations of 
individual men (Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Simmel) will be 
explored in depth. 

Soc 302 Sociological Theory II (3) 

Continuation of Soc 301 with consideration of the work of 
contemporary sociologists (Parsons, Merton), or those who 
have been critical of traditional sociological frameworks 
(Mills, Hoffman, Horowitz). 

Soc 303 Statistics (3) 

Statistical methods used in Sociology. Collection and pre- 
sentation of data. Measures of central value and dispersion. 
Statistical inference. Regression and correlation. Techniques 
in social research. 

Soc 304 Research Methods (3) 

A survey of the strategies and ideological orientations of 
various sociological research perspectives, such as partici- 
pant observations, interviewing, the survey and the experi- 
ment. Stress will be placed on the "how" and "why" of re- 
search orientation more than on the details of "what" to do. 

Soc 310 Problems of American Society (3) 

A consideration of some critical issues of contemporary 
American life, especially in the areas of women's liberation, 
the University, racism, politics and the economy. Students 
will be encouraged to integrate their participation in society 
with their academic reading. 

Soc 321 Sociology of Deviance (3) 

The meaning and process of deviance for different individuals 
and groups will be examined. Consideration will be given to 
modern theories. The notion of social control of deviance will 
also be explored. 

Soc 323 Urban Problems (3) 

Discussion and field work in the Greater Boston area con- 
cerning the interrelationship of various social, political and 



40 



economic problems. Issues such as rent control, suburban 
zoning, Model Cities, transportation and other questions will 
be examined. 

Soc 324 Sociology of the Family (3) 

Will explore how the notion of "family" is viewed according 
to various conceptual frameworks. Internal dynamics of the 
family as well as the family in relation to society will be dis- 
cussed. Psychological and cross-cultural frames of reference 
will be used in exploring alternatives to the nuclear family 
such as the commune. 

Soc 331 Anthropology (3) 

An introduction to the study of the origin of man and culture. 
Institutions and folkways of primitive societies. 

Soc 332 Applied Anthropology (3) 

Will study the changing patterns of different societies, the 
processes involved and analyze the effects of innovations in 
given cultures. 

Prerequisite: Soc 331. 

Soc 334 Human Geography (3) 

The purpose of the course is to give an understanding of 
the reciprocal nature of man and his environment. Review 
of physical geography, the types of climates, relief, soils to 
which man has to adapt his life. The ecological changes 
brought about by man. 

Soc 335 Contemporary Social Movements (3) 

The basic nature of social movements as the solution of 
collective problems will be examined. Determinants and mo- 
tives to join will be explored. Social movements will be 
viewed as responses to current social and political issues. 

Soc 336 Minority Groups (3) 

Origin, structure and problems of minority groups in the 
United States. 

Soc 337 Sociology of Religion (3) 

Will examine the meaning of religious experience from vari- 
ous perspectives and the structure and function of religion in 
modern societies. Stress will be given to how the definition of 
religion varies among different individuals and groups. 

Soc 339 Primitive Religion (3) 

A survey of primitive religions, beliefs and ceremonies. Will 
also study the role of magic and witchcraft in primitive 
societies. 



Soc 340 Social Work (3) 

Development and organization of social services. The funda- 
mental methods in the different fields of social work. 

Soc 341 Sociology of Technology (3) 

Will focus on the role of technology in societies both extinct 
and extant, emphasizing particularly the social effects of 
technological changes during and since the industrial revolu- 
tion. 

Soc 343 Sociology of Occupations and Organizations (3) 

Will consider the interrelationship and historical transforma- 
tion of occupations and organizations, concentrating par- 
ticularly on the causes and consequences of the differentia- 
tion of occupations and the development of large-scale 
bureaucracies in industrial societies. 

Soc 351-352 Comparative Systems (3,3) 
Study of the theories, origins, history and practices of Capital- 
ism, Communism, Socialism, National Socialism. 

Soc 401-402 Senior Seminar (2, 2) 

Soc 404 Social Problems (3) 

Major social problems selected by the class will be studied in 
depth. 

Soc 497-498 Independent Study in Sociology (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that In- 
dependent Study will carry academic credit. Only one Inde- 
pendent Study course should be carried in any one semester. 

Soc 499 Senior Project (3) 

Required of all Sociology majors. 

Courses offered in other departments of which two courses 
chosen will count as upper division courses for Sociology 
majors: 

Ec 370 Labor Economics and Problems (3) 

His 205-206 Social and Cultural History of the United 
States (3, 3) 



41 



His 381-382 The Black Man in American History (3) 

Phil 234 Philosophy of the Community (3) 

PS 334 Political Sociology (3) 

PS 341 Dissent and Revolution (3) 

PS 311-312 Urban Practicum (3, 3) 

PG 248 Developmental Psychology (3) 

PG 371 Social Psychology (3) 

PG 372 Culture and Personality (3) 



Institute of 
Open Education 



The Study of World Cultures 



IS 101-102 The Study of World Cultures I (5,5) 

IS 201-202 The Study of World Cultures II (5, 5) 

The course provides an opportunity to single out for attention 
the great problems which have faced Western man. By way of 
comparison, other cultures are drawn upon to illuminate the 
manner in which mankind has grappled with its questions — 
political, social, economic, philosophical, artistic and reli- 
gious. A list of readings including both primary and secondary 
sources gives depth to the treatment of the material. The 
course, which is a "study", not a "survey", is interdisciplinary 
in nature and selective in its coverage. 



American Studies Program 



COURSE OF STUDY: 

The student in American Studies must have a grade of C or 
better in thirteen semester courses, including AM 401 or AM 
402. Within that credit hour distribution, each major is to 
choose at least one major field and one minor field of con- 



42 



centration. Work in the major field consists of at least twenty- 
four (24) credit hours and the minor field at least twelve (12) 
credit hours. Presently, major fields of concentration include: 
American History, American Government and Politics, Soci- 
ology, Economics and American Literature. Minor fields in- 
clude any of the designated major fields plus American Art, 
American Philosophy, Religion in America and Education. 

It should be noted that when the all-college requirements 
(SWC and English Composition) and American Studies dis- 
tribution requirements are fulfilled, each student still has the 
equivalent of over two years of academic offerings to choose 
as she pleases. Most majors, therefore, try to broaden their 
study of America by choosing offerings in as many disciplines 
as possible. 

A major such as this allows for maximum freedom but also 
places much responsibility on each individual student. There- 
fore each student is encouraged to seek as much counselling 
as she needs in order to fashion a meaningful and compre- 
hensive educational experience. Those students who plan to 
enter specific career fields or contemplate continuing their 
education in graduate or law schools are reminded of the 
advisability of planning their courses with this in mind. 

All majors should submit their proposed schedule of 
courses to their advisor and the Coordinator of American 
Studies prior to semester registration. Additionally, each stu- 
dent is encouraged, though not required, to participate in 
some Independent and/or Work Study programs. It is recom- 
mended, however, that not more than one semester or its 
equivalent be used for such purposes. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

American Studies majors enroll in appropriate courses offered 
by the various departments at the college. A listing of courses, 
in each department, applicable for American Studies credit 
may be obtained from the Program Coordinator. The course 
selection is most comprehensive. Theoretically speaking, 
should a student desire to take every course applicable for 
American Studies she would need eight years to complete 
her studies. In addition there are some specifically designed 
courses for American Studies which include: 

AM 401-402 American Studies Seminar (3,3) 
An examination in depth of certain significant developments 
of the American experience with an emphasis on the modern 
period. Open only to seniors majoring in American Studies 
or American History. AM 402 is a repetition of AM 401 given 
during the second semester. 



AM 495-496 Work Study (0, 3; 0, 3) 

A student who wishes to take one or two semesters of Work 
Study will present a typewritten detailed description of the 
project to be undertaken as agreed to by the professor moni- 
toring the project and as approved by the Dean's office. 

AM 497-498 Independent Study in American Studies 

(0, 3; 0, 3) 
A student who wishes to take one or two semesters of Inde- 
pendent Study will present a typewritten detailed description 
of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by the Dean's office. Nor- 
mally, not more than one Independent Study or Work Study 
should be carried in any one semester. 

AM 499 Senior Project (3) 

Education 

Courses in education offer an introduction to basic philosoph- 
ical, historical, psychological, societal issues. Seminars and 
practicums provide opportunity for involvement and training 
in a variety of educational settings. The total program allows 
students to fulfill the requirements for teacher certification. 
However, it is directly designed to give them a broad vision 
of educational concerns, and the power to serve those con- 
cerns beyond the traditional school framework. 

ED 201-202 Seminar: Philosophy and History of Educa- 
tion (4) 

Philosophical analysis of selected educational problems and 
writings. 

ED 205-206 Survey of Educational Resources of the 
Greater Boston Area (4) 

An introductory course providing information and opportunity 
for observation in a variety of formal and informal learning 
sites. 

ED 209 Introduction to Suburban Community Education: 
Seminar and Practicum (4) 

Closely supervised participation in teaching at the junior high 
school level. Weekly meeting to discuss on-site experience 
and selected readings. 



43 



ED 301 Observing Children: Elementary Education: Semi- 
nar and Practicum (4) 

Each week every participant will observe children for a set 
period of time in a particular type situation which will differ 
each week. The experiences of each observation period will 
be used as the basic discussion material of weekly group 
meetings. 

ED 302 Making and Meaning: Elementary and Secondary 

Education (4) 
A great variety of material will be available from which par- 
ticipants will come to make something. Each making session 
will be followed by a discussion period in which the meanings 
of the making will be explored. 

ED 303 Learning with Children: Elementary Education 

(4) 
Each week every participant accompanied by a child will 
work for a set period in an attempt to solve a problem or 
learn a new skill. The experiences of the learning period will 
be used as the basic discussion material of weekly group 
meetings. 

ED 304 Designs for Learning: Elementary Education: 
Seminar and Practicum (4) 

Each participant will design an activity for a child, then at a 
set time work through the activity with the child. The experi- 
ences of the learning period will be used as the basic dis- 
cussion material of weekly group meetings. 

Ed 309-10 Seminar and Practicum: Secondary Education 

(3,3) 
Discussion, readings and experience in teaching. Students ob- 
serve and participate in learning activities with adolescents 
and common concerns are explored in weekly group sessions. 

Ed 311 Alternative Educational Systems (3) 

This course will be a practical one in which students will take 
on particular projects working with one of the new experi- 
mental programs in the Boston area. These might include the 
C.I.T.Y. School Without Walls, which will be in the design 
phase, the State Experimental School System, a community 
school, or some of the Open Campus programs. The purpose 
will be for the student to experience a variety of situations, 
meet interesting people, and, at the same time, develop a use- 
ful resource for the public schools. 



Ed 313 Community Interaction Through Youth (C.I.T.Y.) 

(3) 
This will be the history of how community participation 
brought into being a "school without walls" from the stage 
of being a concept to a project funded approximately to the 
extent of one million dollars. The steps and progress of the 
program will be explored, the structure of public education at 
local, state and national levels will be sketched out, individ- 
uals from the community who are critical of its success will 
be invited to speak. 



Ed 315 Models of the Learning Process (3) 

The learning process will be looked at — qualitatively — from 
several vantage points, including decision-making theory, 
problem solving, information flows and feedback systems, 
philosophy of education, theories of perception, adaptation 
theory, and students' individual perceptions of how they learn 
best. Teams will each produce a normative model and then 
come together to produce a generally acceptable formula in 
the form of a handbook of the learning process. 

Ed 317 Technology and Education (3) 

This will be a broad attempt to look at the impact of various 
technologies in education and find out the characteristics 
which are valuable. Some new and exciting developments will 
be looked at, including computer assisted instruction, at vari- 
ous levels of sophistication, simulations and games, and new 
technical developments such as highspeed recording, use of 
videorecorder in groups, the Synectics approach toward group 
problem solving, microfiche, and new kinds of communica- 
tions media. 

Ed 401 Urban Community Education Practicum (8) 

Students elect classroom or community settings for educa- 
tional roles in the city. Discussion and readings will focus on 
student concerns and alternatives for commitment to urban 
service. 

Ed 421 The Modern American School: Seminar and Prac- 
ticum in Suburban Community Education (3) 

This seminar will take as its focus the life of the modern 
American school, involving student, teachers, curriculum, 
community, etc. 



44 



Ed 422 Alternatives: Seminar and Practicum in Suburban 
Community Education (3) 

Seminar topics will include American values and education, 
the educating community, and education alternatives. Will 
include field trips and once-weekly small group teaching prac- 
ticum at a Junior High School in Newton. 

Ed 423 Tutorial in Suburban Community Education (3) 

Seminar topics will include American values and education, 
the educating community, and education alternatives. Will 
include field trips and once-weekly small group teaching 
practicum at a Junior High School in Newton. 
Prerequisite: Ed 421. 

Ed 431-432 Field Experience in Education (4) 

Independent non-teaching education project. 

Ed 440 Early Childhood Educational Planning (4) 

Participation in in-service program for parents and teachers 
for local Day Care Centers. 

Ed 497-498 Advanced Seminar and Practicum (4) 

Practice teaching for seniors who have demonstrated special 
competence in teaching. 



Liberal Studies Program 

The Liberal Studies Program, begun in September 1970, is 
Newton's first large scale model for a curriculum which will 
not be discipline-centered and yet will give the student a 
coordinated learning experience, equip her with basic skills 
for thinking along the lines of several disciplines, and provide 
her the opportunity to cooperate with faculty advisors in 
shaping her own undergraduate career. Students who are 
selected to pursue this program must choose some fairly 
specific problem to be solved or movement to be investigated, 
and suggest how, within the resources of Newton's academic 
offerings, they plan to proceed. There is a Coordinator of 
Liberal Studies who must approve this plan, which should be 
neither too narrow nor too vague. Approached with intelligent 
curiosity and open-mindedness, and carried out with thor- 
oughness and accuracy, such a plan will lead the student into 
many fields. She will want to know what has already been 
discovered or suggested about her problem or movement. She 



will need to assess the answers already given and the kind 
of reasoning which has led to these answers. This need will 
urge her to examine the conditions, social, political, religious, 
philosophical and perhaps economic, which precipitated or 
influenced earlier efforts to deal with the questions concerned. 
It is clear that any superficiality in handling the multiple 
phases of these questions will be unsatisfactory to the serious 
student, who must yet, in the end, decide on one phase on 
which she may focus the results of her wide-ranging research. 
In this program, therefore, the Senior Project is particularly 
important. It will always consist of a somewhat lengthy schol- 
arly paper, frequently linked — depending upon the subject — 
to field work. This paper will be the principal evidence of the 
success of the program, and will occupy considerable time 
in the last year of study. 

It is clear that human development of the student is more 
important than the solution of a problem. For this reason, the 
Coordinator of Liberal Studies will keep as closely as possi- 
ble in touch with the students engaged in this program, and 
periodically review how their investigations are progressing, 
so as to assure that the learning experience is synthesized, 
and that there is sufficient richness and variety in the experi- 
ence to make it worthy to be synthesized. 

The early years of this new departure in curriculum will 
gradually establish for it a firm though flexible pattern; stu- 
dent pioneers who opt for it must therefore realize that its 
success and survival depend on their working to make it quite 
visibly succeed. 

A student who wants to substitute Liberal Studies for an- 
other major field will submit in writing to the Coordinator the 
problem or project which is the focus of her interest and a 
list of the courses which she proposes to take in the remain- 
ing semesters of her college career. It is understood that this 
list may be tentative and partial. It will be reviewed, and per- 
haps changed, each semester. The original plan on the basis 
of which the student will be accepted into the Liberal Studies 
Program or not may be submitted at the end of any semester, 
except the last two of the student's academic residence at 
the college. The Liberal Studies Advisory Board will consider 
the plan and together with the Coordinator will decide upon 
its suitability. 



45 



Interdisciplinary Course 

IS 301 The Crisis in American Culture (16) 
This is a pilot program in a cross-disciplinary approach to 
open education. There will be individual or group studies de- 
signed to explore the dilemmas in American culture especially 
from a religious and/or psychological point of view. It will 
constitute the entire semester program of each student. The 
thirty students will be chosen after personal interviews with 
the professors directing the program. 

Graduate Program in Education 

MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY (IN EDUCATION) 
In July 1971 Newton College of the Sacred Heart introduced 
its first graduate program, a Master of Philosophy (in Educa- 
tion) (M.Ph.). 

The fundamental principle of this graduate program is that 
it is the responsibility of Newton College of the Sacred Heart 
to provide a supportive administrative and social structure 
within which the student can create the programs of learning, 
the patterns of activity, best suited to prepare him as an 
educator. 

As designed, the program is made up of three separate 
components. A formal program, created by the students, 
within what has been called the matrix. Next, a full year of 
carefully organized and supported intern teaching or admin- 
istration and, finally, a second program created within the 
matrix. These three components are regarded as a whole and 
credit cannot be transferred from other courses or programs. 
The sequence is also mandatory, but it may begin in June, 
September or February. 



Fees and Expenses 



The costs to the student for a year at Newton College are 
explained below. 

Tuition, Room and Board 

TUITION: 

For the 1971-72 academic year tuition will be $1050 per 

semester. 

ROOM AND BOARD CHARGE: 

The room and board charge for the 1971-72 academic year 

will be $650 per semester. 

SCIENCE LABORATORY FEE: 

Students enrolled in science laboratory courses will be billed 

$25 per course as Science Laboratory Fee. 

STUDIO ART FEES: 

Students enrolled in studio art courses will be billed the fol- 
lowing fees per course: 

Drawing, Painting and Art History $ 5.00 

(Drawing, Intermediate Painting, Introductory 
Studio, Art History with workshops) 



46 



Two-Dimensional Design 
(Graphics, Developmental Painting) 
Three-Dimensional Design 
(Ceramics, Weaving, Photography) 



$10.00 
$15.00 



Reservation Deposit 



EXTRA REGISTRATION FEE: 

An additional tuition fee of $70 is charged for each semester 
hour above the normal schedule of sixteen hours. (This addi- 
tional tuition fee does not apply to the Class of 1972. How- 
ever, members of the Class of 1972 are required to pay eight 
semesters of tuition to the College.) 

TUITION FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Part-time students may enroll for a maximum of eight semes- 
ter hours. The tuition fee for such students will be $70 per 
semester hour. 



SUMMARY OF BASIC FEES: 
Tuition for the academic year 
Room and board for the academic year 



$2100 
1300 

$3400 



Other Fees 



APPLICATION FEE: 

A fee of $15 is charged for initial application to the College. 

This fee is non-refundable. 

LATE REGISTRATION OR CHANGE OF SCHEDULE: 

There is a $10 charge for registering after Registration Day 

or for dropping or adding a course after the deadline. 

LATE RESERVATION DEPOSIT: 

There is a $10 penalty charge for paying the Reservation 

Deposit after the deadline. 

GRADUATION FEE: 

Students in the graduating class will be billed a $25 gradua- 
tion fee during the second semester of their senior year. 

PARKING PERMIT FOR RESIDENT STUDENTS: 

$25 per year, applicable to all resident students having auto- 
mobiles on campus. 

PARKING PERMIT FOR COMMUTING STUDENTS: 

$15 per year, applicable to all commuting students having 

automobiles on campus. 



ENTERING STUDENTS: 

A candidate for admission is charged a fee of $15 for initial 
application. Upon notification that she has been admitted to 
Newton College, the candidate must return with her accept- 
ance a Reservation Deposit of $200 which will be credited in 
full to her tuition bill for the first semester. The Reservation 
Deposit is non-refundable after the due date except to a stu- 
dent whose academic record at the end of her senior year in 
high school proves unsatisfactory. 

CURRENTLY ENROLLED STUDENTS: 

Students currently enrolled at the College who wish to reserve 
a place for the next academic year must submit a $200 Reser- 
vation Deposit by April 15. This deposit, which is credited in 
full to her tuition bill for the next semester, is non-refundable 
after the due date except to a student whose academic record 
is unsatisfactory. 



Student Health Insurance 

The College's Student Health Insurance covers limited medi- 
cal and hospital expenses not included in the normal services 
of the Newton College Health Service. As students are nor- 
mally covered by family insurance plans, the Student Health 
Insurance provided by Newton College is designed to supple- 
ment such paid policies and is not intended to be a compre- 
hensive policy. Coverage is on an annual basis. A brochure 
describing coverage is forwarded to students and parents at 
the beginning of each academic year. Additional copies are 
available from the College Student Health Service. 

ACCIDENTS 

The plan provides reimbursement for all medical expenses up 
to $1,000 which may result from accidents, and 75% of ex- 
penses in excess of $1,000 up to $1,500. 

SICKNESS 

In case of sickness, the policy provides reimbursement for 
medical treatment up to $500, except that no benefit is pay- 
able for the first physician's visit if the student is not confined 
to a hospital. (The infirmary operated by Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart, Spellman Infirmary, is not a hospital.) For 
expenses above $500, the policy covers 75% of incurred 
medical expenses up to $2,000. 



47 



These benefits are in addition to any benefits the student 
may receive under a personal policy or membership in a 
hospital association. As students are normally covered by 
family insurance plans, the Student Health Insurance provided 
by Newton College is designed to supplement such paid 
policies and is not intended to be a comprehensive policy. 
Coverage is on an annual basis. 

Schedule of Payments 

RESERVATION DEPOSIT 

Early Decision Applicants by January 15 

Entering Freshmen by May 1 

Currently Enrolled Students by April 15 

FALL SEMESTER FEES by August 15 

OTHER FALL SEMESTER CHARGES Immediately 

SPRING SEMESTER CHARGES by January 15 

OTHER SPRING SEMESTER CHARGES Immediately 

Note: All College fees are subject to change at any time at 
the discretion of the College. 

Plans of Payment 

Many Newton College families have, in recent years, elected 
to meet college expenses from current income through tuition 
payment plans which are available. Three such plans are 
endorsed by Newton College and further information may be 
obtained by writing directly to the addresses listed below, 
a) College Aid Plan, Inc. 

1008 Elm Street 

Manchester, New Hampshire 03101 

Education Funds, Inc. 

Howard Building — Box 4 

Providence, Rhode Island 02903 

The National Shawmut Bank 

Tuition Aid Program 

542 Commonwealth Avenue 

Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



b) 



Refund Policy 



The tuition fee is not refundable except to a student whose 
credentials are unsatisfactory. The room and board fee may 
be returned on a pro-rata basis. 




Board of Trustees 



Elizabeth Sweeney, R.S.C.J., B.S. 
Newton, Massachusetts 
Chairman of the Board 

Katherine Baxter, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Miami, Florida 

John H. Chandler, Ph.D. 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



Catherine Collins, R. S.C.J. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

Louis Desaulniers, B.A. 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Jean Ford, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

J. Peter Grace III, M.B.A. 
New York, New York 



M.A. 



48 



James T. Harris, Jr., M.A. 
Chicago, Illinois 

T. Vincent Learson, B.A., L.H.D. 
Rye, New York 

Catherine E. Maguire, R. S.C.J. , Ph.D. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

Thomas H. D. Mahoney, Ph.D. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Anne O'Neil, R.S.C.J., M.A., M.S. 
New York, New York 

Roger L. Putnam, B.A., L.H.D. 
Petersham, Massachusetts 

Mary H. Quinlan, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Newton, Massachusetts 

James J. Whalen, Ph.D. ex officio 
Newton, Massachusetts 



Advisory Board 



John S. Crowley, M.B.A. 

Theodore Marier, M.A. 

Philip J. McNiff, B.A., B.Sc. 

Richard H. Nolan, LLB. 

Right Reverend Msgr. Timothy O'Leary, Ph.D. 

Daniel Sargent, M.A. 

Frank Sawyer 

John W. Spellman, M.D. 

Alice M. Walsh (Mrs. Robert Walsh), M.A. 

Honorable Kevin H. White 



Division Directors 



HELEN R. COWIE, Ph.D. 
Director, Division of Language, Literature and 
Communications 

OFELIA GARCIA, R.S.C.J., M.F.A. 
Director, Division of Humanities and Fine Arts 

CHARLES R. BOTTICELLI, Ph.D. 

Director, Division of Science and Mathematics 



MARGARET M. GORMAN, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Director, Division of Social Science and Religion 

JOHN BREMER, M.A. (Hons.), F.R.G.S. 
Director, Institute of Open Education 

Administration 

JAMES J. WHALEN, Ph.D. 
President; Professor of Psychology 

GRAEME COLE, B.A. 
Assistant to the President 

JANIS I. SOMERVILLE, M.B.A. 
Director of Planning 

JOHN BREMER, M.A. (Hons.), F.R.G.S. 
Academic Dean; Director, Institute of Open Education; 
Professor of Philosophy and Education 

DORICE WRIGHT, M.A.T. 
Assistant Academic Dean 

FRANCES A. CONNELLY, M.Ed. 
Registrar 

JEREMY SLINN, A.L.A. 
Librarian 

CAROLE R. NERI, M.A., M.S. 
Director of Admissions 

MARKEY P. BURKE (Mrs. Thomas F.), B.A. 
Director of Career Counseling 

FRANCES de LA CHAPELLE, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Dean of Students 

DOROTHEA ENGLER (Mrs. Robert Engler), B.A. 
Director of Residence Life 

KENNETH MacDONALD, M.D. 
Director of Student Health Services 

MARGARET McDONNELL, R.S.C.J., R.N. 
Coordinator of Student Health Services 

JOAN S. NORTON, Ed.M. 
Financial Aid Counselor 

REVEREND ROBERT BRAUNREUTHER, S.J. 
Chaplain 

REVEREND JOHN McCALL, S.J., Ph.D. 
Resident Consultant to Counseling Staff 



49 



R. JAMES HENDERSON, M.Ed. 
Vice President, Business Administration and Development 

CLAIRE KONDOLF, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Director of Alumnae Affairs 

ELIZABETH A. BARRY, B.A. 
Director of Publications 

RICHARD 0. DEE, B.S. 
Assistant to Vice President for Administrative and 
Business Affairs 

EARL FRIOT 
Director of Physical Plant 

RONALD COHEN 
Manager of Food Service 



Alumnae Association of Newton College ot the Sacred Heart 
National Council of the Alumnae Association 



Mrs. John M. Conroy 
791 Webster Avenue 
New Rochelle, New York 10805 

Mrs. Robert M. Donahue 
225 Dudley Road 
Brookline, Massachusetts 

Mrs. John J. Kalagher 

8609 Fox Run 

Potomac, Maryland 20854 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
30 Bancroft Road 
Wellesley, Massachusetts 

Mrs. John F. McNamara 
1772 Villa Road 
Birmingham, Michigan 48009 



Faculty 



JAMES J. WHALEN, Ph.D. 

President; Professor of Psychology 
B.A. Franklin and Marshall College; M.S. Pennsylvania 
State University; Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University. 



JOHN BREMER, M.A. (Hons.), F.R.G.S. 

Academic Dean; Director, Institute of Open Education; 

and Professor of Philosophy and Education 
B.A. (Hons.), M.A. (Hons.), University of Cambridge; 
A.M., St. John's College; Dip. Ed., University of Leicester; 
Fellow, Royal Geographical Society. 

MARY DAY ALBERT, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.A. University of New Hampshire; M.A. Bryn Mawr College; 
Ph.D. Brown University. 

JANE APPLETON (Mrs. William Appleton), A.B. 
Instructor in Music 
A.B. Wheaton College. 

FLORENCE ASHE, R.S.C.J., A.B. 
Coordinator of Education Information 
A.B. Manhattanville College; B.S. Villanova University. 

WILLIAM A. BEARSE, III, B.A. 
Instructor in Psychology 
B.A. Boston University; Candidate for Ph.D. Boston University. 

MARJORIE BELL, M.Ed. 

Director of Physical Education 
Graduate of the Sargent School of Physical Education; B.S. 
Boston University; M.Ed. Suffolk University. 

CHARLES R. BOTTICELLI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology; Chairman, Department of Biological 

Sciences and Director, Division of Science and Mathematics 

B.A. University of Connecticut; M.A. Williams College; 

Ph.D. Harvard University. 

ANNE BREMER (Mrs. John Bremer), B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Education; Coordinator, 

Education Program 
Homerton College, Cambridge; B.A. (Hons.) University of 
Sheffield; Fellow, Royal Geographical Society. 

LILLIAN BRODERICK (Mrs. James Broderick), Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English and Director, Freshman 

English 
B.A. Newcomb College; M.A. University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 

EILEEN BROWN, Ed.M. 

Assistant Professor of Education, Graduate Program in 
Education 
A.B. Immaculata College; Ed.M. Harvard University 



50 



ELIZABETH J. BUCKLEY (Mrs. Jerome H. Buckley), M.A. 
Lecturer in English 
B.A. University of Toronto; M.A. University of Wisconsin. 

AILEEN M. COHALAN, R.S.C.J., M.Mus. 

Lecturer in Music 
B.Mus. Manhattanville College; M.Mus. Boston University; 
Colleague, American Guild of Organists. 

JOSEPH F. CONWAY, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Political Science and History 
B.A. University of Rochester; M.A. University of Rochester. 

FREDERIC COURTOIS 
Lecturer in Art 
Ecole Saint Luc; Academic des Beaux-Arts, Liege, Belgium. 

NELLY COURTOIS (Mme. Frederic Courtois) 

Assistant Professor of French 
Diplome, Ecole Centrale de Service Sociale, Brussels; 
Brevet, Alliance Francaise, Paris; Diplome Superieur de 
Langue Moderne, Paris. 

HELEN R. COWIE, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English; Chairman, Department of 

English and Director, Division of Language, Literature 

and Communications 
B.A. State University of Iowa; M.A. State University of 
Iowa; Ph.D. Columbia University. 

FRANCES CUNNINGHAM, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.S. Villanova College; 
Ph.D. Catholic University of America. 

ROBERT J. CURRAN, M.A. 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A. Fordham University; M.A. Fordham University. 

MARGARET DEVER (Mrs. Joseph Dever), Ed.M. 
Associate Professor of History; Coordinator, Study 
of World Cultures Program 
B.A. Mount Saint Scholastica; Ed.M. Harvard University. 

UBALDO DiBENEDETTO, Ph.D. 

Professor of Italian and Spanish 
B.A. Northeastern University; M.Ed. Bridgewater State 
College; M.A. Middlebury College; Ph.D. University of Madrid. 



CHRISTIAN J. DONAHUE, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.A. Stonehill College; M.A. Boston University; Candidate 
for Ph.D. Boston University. 

ROBERT ENGLER, M.A., M.C.P. 

Instructor in Sociology 
B.A. Notre Dame University; M.A. Notre Dame University; 
M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

VERA ERDELY (Mrs. Alexander Erdely), M.A. 
Assistant Professor of French 
M.A. Harvard University; Candidate for Ph.D. Boston College. 

ELIZABETH EVANS (Mrs. Hugh Evans), M.A. 
Instructor in English 
B.A. Durham University; M.A. London University. 

FRANCES D. FERGUSON (Mrs. Peter J. Ferguson), M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art History 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. Harvard University; Candidate 
for Ph.D. Harvard University. 

JOHN H. FLANNAGAN, JR., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of History; Coordinator, American 

Studies Program 
B.A. Holy Cross; M.A. Detroit University; Candidate for 
Ph.D. Georgetown University. 

ANTOINETTE de B. FREDERICK, M.A. 
Instructor in English 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. University of Michigan. 

MARIA V. FUSTER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Licenciada en filosofia y letras (filologia romanica) 
University of Madrid; Candidate for Ph.D. Boston College. 

OFELIA GARCIA, R.S.C.J., B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art; Chairman, Department of Art 
and Director, Division of Humanities and Fine Arts 
Escuela Nacionale de Bellas Artes, La Habana; B.A. Man- 
hattanville College; Candidate for M.F.A. Boston Museum 
School 

PATRICIA GEOGHEGAN, R.S.C.J., M.F.A. 

Instructor in Art 
B.F.A. Newcomb College, Tulane University; M.F.A. Tufts 
University. 



51 



LUBOMIRGLEIMAN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Science 
B.A. Thomas More Institute, Montreal; M.A. Institute of 
Medieval Studies, University of Montreal; Ph.D. Institute 
of Medieval Studies, University of Montreal; Graduate 
study at the University of Bratislava, Solvakia, University 
of Munich, Germany and University of Innsbruck, Austria. 

JOAN GOLDSMITH, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Education, Graduate Program in 
Education and Chairman, Graduate Program in Education 
B.A. Antioch College; M.A. University of Chicago. 

MARGARET MARY GORMAN, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology; Chairman, Department of 

Psychology and Director, Division of Social Science and 

Religion 
B.A. Trinity College (Washington); M.A. Fordham University; 
Ph.D. Catholic University of America. 

NATALIE A. HARRIS (Mrs. Richard Harris), Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. Boston University; Ph.D. 
Brandeis University. 

ALLISON HUEY, B.A. 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A. Bryn Mawr College; Candidate for Ph.D. George Wash- 
ington University. 

L. EDWARD KAMOSKI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy 
B.A. Tufts University; M.A. Tufts University; Ph.D. Cornell 
University. 

NEIL KAUFFMAN, Ed.M. 

Instructor in Education 
A.B. Brandeis University; Ed.M. Harvard University; Candidate 
Ed.D. Harvard University. 

ELIZABETH KOVALTCHOUK-KEAN (Mrs. Basil Kean), B.A. 

Associate Professor of Russian 
Kiev Bymnazia, Russia; Certificat d'Etudes, Cairo, Egypt; 
B.A. St. Vincent of Paul's College, Egypt. 

WILLIAM T. KENNEDY, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Education 
B.Sc, Ph.D. The Queens University, Belfast. 



JANA M. KIELY (Mrs. Robert J. Kiely), M.A. 

Lecturer in Biology 
Licence de Sciences Naturelles, Sorbonne; M.A. Radcliffe 
College. 

DONALD F. KRIER, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics; Chairman, Department of 

Economics 
B.S. Marquette University; M.A. Marquette University; Ph.D. 
Boston College. 

MAXINE KUMIN (Mrs. Victor Kumin), M.A. 
Lecturer in English 
A.B. Radcliffe College; M.A. Radcliffe College. 

GUILLEMINE de LACOSTE (Mme. Philippe de Lacoste), 

Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Philosophy; Chairman, Department 

of Philosophy 
B.A. Newton College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. Georgetown 
University; Ph.D. University of Paris. 

PHILIPPE de LACOSTE, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
Licentiate in Law, University of Paris; M.A. University 
of Paris; Ph.D. University of Paris. 

PHILIP LADER, A.M. 

Instructor in Political Science 
A.B. Duke University; A.M. University of Michigan; Candidate 
for J. D. Harvard University. 

CHARLES K. LEVY, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Biology 
B.S. George Washington University; M.S. George Washington 
University; Ph.D. University of North Carolina. 

DORIS INGRAM LEWIS (Mrs. Frederick P. Lewis), Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. Duke University; Ph.D. Tufts University. 

ELAINE BIGANESS LIVINGSTONE (Mrs. Melvin Living- 
stone), B.F.A. 
Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A. Massachusetts College of Art; Associate Scholar, 

Radcliffe Institute for Independent Study. 

PIERRE Y. S. LUBENEC 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Diplome, Ecole Centrale de Paris, Paris. 



52 



CATHERINE E. MAGUIRE, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 
B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; M.A. Columbia 
University; Ph.D. Fordham University. 

PHILIP MARCUS, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Art 
Graduate of the Museum of Fine Arts School; B.F.A. Tufts 
University; M.A. Harvard University. 

MARY A. McCAY (Mrs. Douglas McCay), M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. Catholic University of America; M.A. Boston College; 
Candidate for Ph.D. Tufts University. 

JAMES W. McCLAIN, B.A. 

Instructor in History 
B.A. Providence College; Graduate study at Boston College 
School of Social Work. 

MARIE MULLIN McHUGH (Mrs. Edward J. McHugh), Ph.D. 

Professor of History; Chairman, Department of History 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Radcliffe College; Ph.D. 
Radcliffe College. 

faine Mcmullen, r.s.c.j., m.a., j.d. 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; J.D. Fordham Univer- 
sity; M.A. Manhattanville College; Graduate study at 
Catholic University of America. 

RICHARD HAYES MILLER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of American Studies 
B.S. Fordham University; M.A. Fordham University; Ph.D. 
Georgetown University. 

WILLIAM E. MURNION, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion; Chairman, Department 

of Religion 
Ph.L. Gregorian University; S.T.L. Gregorian University; 
Ph.D. Gregorian University; Candidate for S.T.D. Gregorian 
University. 

RENEE G. NAVES, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 
M.S. University of Geneva; Ph.D. University of Geneva. 

ANTHONY NEMETHY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology; Chairman, Department of Sociology 
B.A. Academy of Law, Kecskemet; M.S. College of Agricul- 
ture, Vienna; Ph.D. Royal Hungarian Palatin, Joseph 
University of Technical and Economic Sciences, Budapest. 



SHARON O'BRIEN, M.A. 
Instructor in English 
B.A. Radcliffe College; M.A. Harvard University. 

PHYLLIS G. ORAM, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A. Bard College; M.A. Boston University; Ph.D. Boston 
University. 

HERBERT F. OSTRACH, M.A. 
Instructor in Art 
B.A. Brown University; M.A. Brown University. 

JOHN PHILIBERT 
Assistant Professor of Art 
Catholic University of America. 

KENNETH J. PRESKENIS, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics; Chairman, Depart- 
ment of Mathematics 

B.A. Boston College; M.A. Brown University; Ph.D. Brown 

University. 

CAROL PUTNAM, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Art 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.F.A. Catholic University of 
America; M.A. Catholic University of America; Ph.D. 
Catholic University of America. 

NAJMA RIZVI, M.A. 

Instructor in Sociology 
B.A., M.A. University of Dacca; M.A. University of Florida; 
M.A. University of Denver. 

SHERMAN RODDY, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A. Wheaton College (Illinois); B.D. Eastern Baptist 
Seminary; M.A. University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. University 
of Pennsylvania. 

ROBERT G. ROGERS, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.S. Ohio State University; S.T.B. Boston University School 
of Theology; Ph.D. Boston University; Graduate study at 
the University of London Institute of Archaeology and at 
the School of Oriental and African Studies. 

JUDITH B. SCHAEFER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 
A.B. University of Chicago; M.A. University of Chicago; 
Ph.D. University of Chicago. 



53 



RUTH M. SCHICKEL, R. S.C.J. , M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Catholic University of 
America; Graduate study at Stanford University. 

WILLIAM J. SCHICKEL, B.A. 

Instructor in Economics 
B.A. University of Notre Dame; Candidate for Ph.D. Boston 
College. 

ALBERT C. SCHNEIDER, JR., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A. Harvard College; M.A. Harvard University; Candidate 
for Ph.D. Harvard University. 

RAY A. SHEPARD, M.A.T. 

Assistant Professor of Education, Graduate Program in 

Education 
B.S. University of Nebraska; M.A.T. (English) Harvard 
University; Candidate for Ed.D. Harvard University. 

VINCENT J. SOLOMITA, B.Arch. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.Arch. Pratt Institute; Study at American Art School of 
Fontainbleau, France; Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris. 

RICHARD W. SPRAGUE, Ed.D. 

Lecturer in Education 
B.A. University of Massachusetts; M.A.T. Harvard University; 
Ed.D. Harvard University 

JOHN M. STECZYNSKI, M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.F.A. University of Notre Dame; M.F.A. Yale University 
School of Design. 

ELLEN A. TAXER, Ph.D. 

Professor of German; Chairman, Department of Modern 
Languages 
M.S. University of Vienna; Ph.D. University of Vienna. 

JAMES F. TAYLOR, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Classics; Chairman, Department 

of Classics 
B.A. Haverford College; A.M. Harvard University; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 

GILLIAN H. WHALEN, M.A. 

Lecturer in Linguistics 
B.A. Pennsylvania State University; M.A. University of 
Pittsburgh. 



ELIZABETH S. WHITE, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Radcliffe College; Ph.D. 
Catholic University of America. 

GEORGE M. WILLIAMS, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.A. Grand Canyon College; B.D. Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. University of Iowa. 

BOLESLAW A. WYSOCKI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 
Certificate in Business Administration, University of Cracow; 
Diploma in Psychology and Statistics, University of Edin- 
burgh; Certificate, University of Cambridge; M.A. University 
of Cracow; Ph.D. University of London. 

DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH, 
THE PHYSICAL SCIENCE GROUP 

The purpose of the Division of Sponsored Research is to 
carry out research and development work in education. The 
first projects to be worked on are those of the Physical Sci- 
ence Group, formerly at Education Development Center, which 
joined the College on June 1, 1971. These include an under- 
graduate program for the preparation of physics-chemistry 
teachers and several physical science programs on the sec- 
ondary level. The Physical Science Group is housed on the 
first floor of the Barry Science Pavilion. 

GERALD L ABEGG, Ph.D. 
Staff Scientist and Coordinator of Pilot Programs 

JUDSON B. CROSS, B.S. 
Staff Scientist and Deputy Director 

RICHARD J. DUFFY, Ph.D. 
Staff Scientist 

ROBERT ESTIN, Ph.D. 
Staff Scientist and Coordinator of School Services 

GEORGE V. FRIGULIETTI 
Artist 

URI HABER-SCHAIM, Ph.D. 
Staff Scientist and Director 

JO RITA JORDAN, Ph.D. 
Staff Scientist 

GERALDINE KLINE, A.B. 
Administrative Assistant 



54 



STEPHEN V. McKAUGHAN 
Head of Shop 

BENJAMIN T. RICHARDS 
Editor 

KATHERINE SOLOVICOS 
Administrative Assistant for School Services 

JAMES A. WALTER, B.S. 
Staff Scientist 



Gifts and Bequests 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart is one of the youngest members of the 
group of schools which have made New England an educational center of 
the country. Its needs are many. Therefore, its Trustees will welcome gifts, 
bequests, or awards which may be dedicated to general educational needs, 
or to the endowment of professorships, scholarships or fellowships in 
accordance with the wishes of the donor. Such funds could constitute 
memorials to the donor or to any person whom he may name. 

Donors may seek their own legal counsel or make bequests in the 
following form: 

I give and bequest to Newton College of the Sacred Heart, Inc., an 
educational corporation established by special charter in Newton, State of 

Massachusetts, the sum of dollars, to be 

appropriated by the Trustees of the College for its benefit. 



55 



Index 



Academic Calendar / IBC 
Academic Policies / 3 
Accidents / 47 
Administration / 49 
Advisory Board / 49 
Alumnae Association / 50 
American Studies Program / 42 
Application Fee / 47 
Art/ 14 
Art History/ 14 

Bachelor of Arts / 2 
Bachelor of Science / 3 
Bequests / 55 
Biology / 24 
Board of Trustees / 48 

Change of Schedule / 3 
Chemistry / 26 
Classics Program / 6 
Comparative Literature Program / 6 
Course Load / 5 
Courses of Instruction / 6 
Credit for Other Work / 4 
Cross-Registration / 4 
Curriculum / 2 

Degree Requirements / 2 
Division and 

Department Chairmen / 49 

Economics / 30 



Education / 43 
Education Program / 3 
English / 7 
Extra Registration Fee / 47 

Faculty / 50 

Fees / 47 

Fees and Expenses / 46 

French / 10 

German / 11 

Gifts and Bequests / 55 

Grading System / 4 

Health Insurance / 47 
History/ 18 
Honors / 4 

Incomplete Grades / 4 
Independent Study and Reading / 4 
Interdisciplinary Majors / 3 
Italian / 12 

Late Fees / 47 

Liberal Studies Program / 45 

Majors / 3 
Mathematics / 27 
Modern Languages / 9 
Music / 20 
Music Program / 3 

Non-Major Fields / 3 



Parking Permit Fees / 47 
Pass/Fail Courses / 5 
Payment Plans / 48 
Payment Schedule / 48 
Philosophy / 21 
Physics / 29 
Political Science / 31 
Pre-Medical Studies / 25 
Psychology / 34 

Readmission / 5 
Refund Policy / 48 
Registration / 5 
Registry / 48 
Religion / 37 
Reservation Deposit / 47 
Room and Board / 46 
Russian / 12 

Science / 30 

Science Education / 29 

Sickness / 47 

Sociology / 40 

Spanish / 12 

Studio Art/ 16 

Study Abroad / 5 

Study of World Cultures / 42 

Tuition / 46 

Tuition — Part-Time / 47 

Withdrawals / 5 



56 



1971-1972 Academic Calendar 



Saturday, September 4 

Sunday, September 5 

September 5, 6 & 7 

Tuesday, September 7 

Wednesday, September 8 

Monday, October 11 

Monday, October 25 

Wednesday, November 24 

through 
Sunday, November 28 

Thursday, December 16 

through 
Tuesday, December 22 

Wednesday, December 23 

through 
Sunday, January 30 



FIRST TERM 
Juniors return to campus 
Freshmen arrive 
Freshman Orientation 
Resident students return 
Classes begin 
Columbus Day (Holiday) 
Veterans Day (Holiday) 

Thanksgiving Holiday 

Reading and Examination period 



Winter Recess (an academic program 
available January 3-28) 



Monday, January 31 

Monday, February 21 

Thursday, March 30 

through 
Sunday, April 9 

Friday, May 19 
through 
Tuesday, May 23 

Sunday, May 28 



SECOND TERM 
Classes begin 
Washington's Birthday (Holiday) 

Spring Vacation 

Reading and Examination period 
Commencement Day 



The College reserves the right to make changes in the regulations and courses announced in this catalog. 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart 

Newton, Massachusetts 02159